TURKISH BOMBARD – a-post-script. And metal casting setup ready.

I made this 1:10 scale model of the Turkish Bombard which currently resides in the Royal Armories Museum, Portsmouth, in 2016.  I specify “currently” because I originally saw this cannon in 1979 at The Tower of London.  And long before that it was used in Turkey, guarding the Dardanelles.  Quite likely used in anger in 1805 against a British fleet, approximately 340 years after it was made for Sultan Mehmet “the conquerer”. 

And I re-visited the original in May 2019. It seems like half a lifetime ago. Mainly I visited the UK to see the Trevithick dredger engine in the London Science Museum, but the Turkish bombard was the second reason. I could not find a photograph of the touch-hole in the bombard anywhere. And my requests to the museum went unanswered.

The original bombard in the Royal Armories Museum, Portsmouth, UK.

So, here is my photograph of the touch hole, in case anyone else is inclined to make a model. I guarantee that this is the only photo of the touch hole which you will find, with my hand anyway.

The Turkish bombard touch hole
My 1:10 scale model of the bombard. I still have not added the touch hole.
The Arabic script around the muzzle. Not as good as in the original. But as good as I could manage in 2016.
and the large thread between the barrel segments


So, I made this model, in wood, as a practice run, intending to make a bronze model eventually.

The reason for this post script is that I had a question from a reader about a remark which I had made in 2016. And I could not find my original photographs. So I took some more, as you have seen.

And……… very excited to announce that I now have a foundry setup, and could possibly make a bronze example of the bombard. But first I intend to obtain some casting skills, by making parts for my 1:10 Armstrong cannon.

I replaced the analogue controller with a digital type in the potter’s oven which I had recently purchased, and today my wiring was checked by an expert before we ran a test run. (thanks Stuart!) All good, up to 750ºC, which is enough for preparing the investment molds.

Here is a shot of the oven, and the metal melting furnace.

PANA3860

from the right, the melting furnace which should be adequate for 3kg of brass/bronze,  and the investment oven. The oven might also be useful for metal tempering. Note the Hebel bricks behind the oven.

Hopefully, the first attempt at a casting session in a couple of days.