johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Modelling a Turkish Bombard -4 Decoration

The decoration around the barrel is formed by a repeating pattern, which when milled, very cleverly forms 2 identical patterns.  One is excavated and one is the original barrel surface.  You will see what I mean if you look at the pictures in the earlier blog, and the video below.

It took me an evening of experimenting on the computer to work out the system and draw it.

bombard-pattern3

Then I measured the diameters of the 2 gun components, calculated the circumference, (OK it is not rocket science.   3.142 times diameter), then working out the number of identical shapes which would fit around the 2 different diameters, at the same size and spacing.   Amazingly, it took 18 shapes to fit almost exactly around the barrel, and 16 of identical size almost exactly around the breech.  the angular spacing was 20 degrees and 22.5 degrees.

Then the shape was imported into V-Carve Pro, and G codes were generated.

My CNC mill does not have a 4th axis, so I used a dividing head to move the workpiece at the precise angles.  See the setup in the video.  That meant that the pattern was engraved into 16 and 18 flat surfaces, rather than a continuous cylinder as on the original.

It worked very well.  There were minor compromises due to the shapes being milled with a fine end mill but when you look at the pics I hope that you will agree that it is effective.

I calculated that the milling had to be at a maximum depth of 2mm in order to cope with the curvature, but if I do it again,  I would reduce the depth by 25%.

The first part of the video is a shot of CNC drilling.  Then the CNC routing of the repeating patterns.  Each angular setting of the pattern took 4 minutes to complete.  136 minutes altogether.  In reality, it took a whole day, most of which was spent doing the setups.

 

 

Bombard Model-3 turning the barrel

Another session or two, and this project is complete.

Now how do I make a cannon ball 62-63 mm diameter?  In wood will be ok?  Does not have to be granite.  I could make a mould and cast it in aluminium or lead, but stone would be authentic…..   thinking.

ps.  Re cannon balls.  I will cast them, in cement!   Now, how to make a mould.

Bombard Model -2. Big Thread

The breech and the barrel are joined with a very large thread.  On my 1:10 scale model it is 60mm diameter, and has a pitch of 6 mm.  These dimensions are measured off Internet photos of the original bombard, so they might not be faithfully accurate to the original bombard.  If anyone has accurate plans of the bombard I would be very interested to hear from them.

I experimented with various spindle speeds, feed rates, depth of cut, and finally decided that red gum wood is not the ideal material to be cutting a thread with sharp points.  However, at 200rpm, and taking 50 cuts to reach the full depth, and using a very sharp tool, the end result was OK.  I will fill the tearouts.

In order to make a functional join in the wooden cannon, I truncated the apex of the thread.  In the gunmetal version I will attempt a more faithful to the original, sharp look.

For some reason, the wood held together better during the internal thread cutting than the external.

 

The male thread was cut on my newly CNC converted lathe,  between centres, but the fixed steady on that lathe was just too small to hold the barrel, so the internal thread was cut on my bigger Chinese lathe.

Next I will bore the barrel to 63mm, then turn the exterior of the barrel.

 

Bombard Model. Turning the Breech

 

So if you watched the video, you can see that I have a problem with the big thread between the breech and the barrel, at least in the wooden prototype.  It might work better in brass or gunmetal.

The thread has a pitch of 6mm and a diameter of 60mm.   It is big.

My plan at this time, is to make a brass male threaded section, and glue or screw it into the breech.  Then to make a steel tap using the same G code, and cut a thread into the wood of the barrel.

Turkish Bombard 1:10 scale

Just for fun I will use my newly converted CNC lathe to make a 1:10 bombard.  The original was cast in 1464 and was thought to be a close copy of the bombards which Mehmet 2 (“the conqueror”) used to breach the walls of Constantinople in 1453.  There are several of these bombards still in existence, including one in UK, which was given to Queen Victoria by the then Turkish Sultan.

These bombards were last used, against the British, in 1807, when a British warship was holed with substantial loss of life.  Pretty amazing for a 340 year old weapon.

images

5.2 meters long, 1.060 meter diameter. 16.8 tonnes.

b281d1ba4455df20d7b832411bb00443

The large thread connected the halves.  Easier transportation, and casting.

 

images

Is this Turkish or Arabic?

images

Granite balls are 630mm diameter.

 

tembokkotakonstantinopel

A reconstruction of the walls of Constantinople, with moat.  Almost 1000 years old in 1453  

walls-of-constantinople

And as they are today.  Massive.  High.

29962555-Huge-siege-the-final-assault-and-fall-of-Constantinople.jpg

Huge siege cannon used in the final assault and fall of Constantinople in 1453. Diorama in Askeri Museum, Istanbul, Turkey.  The bombards were probably dug in, to manage the massive recoil, and concentrate the aim at a particular wall section.  There is a wooden structure built around the cannon in the background of this modern picture.  As far as I know there are no surviving  wooden structures like this.  Nor have I come across any old pictures, but if anyone knows of any I would be very interested.  The bombards took about 3 hours to cool, cleanout and reload.  

p1090990.jpg

My model will be about 520mm long.  I would like to make it from bronze, or gunmetal as in the original.  Any mistakes will be costly.

So I have decided to make a prototype in wood.  That will test my drawing, the machining procedure, and the final appearance.  Not to mention how the CNC lathe will handle the task.

I will use a very dense, tight grained Australian hardwood (red gum).  The wood was salvaged when my house stumps were replaced with concrete.  Some was used to make parquetry, and the rest was put aside for possible future use.  Such as this.

IMG_4313.JPG

About to cut off the below ground section of a 70 year old house stump.

IMG_4320.JPG

A 5hp metal lathe with a tungsten bit chomps through the hard dry wood.

IMG_4322.JPG

I turned 6 lengths before I found 2 that were satisfactory.  The rest had sap holes or splits.

I have used Ezilathe to generate the G codes.

to be continued….

 

CNC Lathe Conversion- final

Before I am hung, drawn and quartered, for operating a lathe without guards, here is the proof that I have been sensible.

IMG_4292.JPG

Guard over the X axis pulleys.  I like to watch the wheels going round and round, hence the transparent top.   Also note the cover over the exposed ball screw.

IMG_4293.JPG

Cover over the Z axis pulleys and belt, again transparent.  If I wore a watch it would be transparent.

IMG_4295.JPG

I also installed an ER40 collet chuck.   I will be using this for all work with diameters under 26mm.

A Matter of Scale

Before I get onto a brief reflection about scale, the photo below shows 2 cannon barrels.

The big one was what impelled me to converting a manual lathe into a CNC lathe.  That time consuming, costly, and ultimately very satisfying project, started because the CNC lathe which I used to turn the big barrel could only handle the job by doing it in two stages…. doing the breech first then the muzzle.  That was due to the big barrel being too long for the lathe, at 300mm (12″).

The small barrel was a test for the CNC converted lathe just finished, being the first complicated shape which I have made.   To save on material, I made it at exactly half the scale of the big one, ie 150mm long (6″).

IMG_4291.JPG

Comparing the two barrels reminded me, that if an object is twice as big as another, in all 3 dimensions (height, width, depth), it is 8 times as heavy.   And any projectile, and weight of black powder, would also be 8 times the weight.  But the wall thickness of the explosion chamber is only TWICE as thick.

My point is, that if scale is maintained, the smaller the cannon, steam engine, boiler, whatever…..  the less likely it is to explode.

Not that these cannons will ever be fired.  Just hypothetically.

CNC Lathe Conversion – 17

First Test Run

After some test runs without tool or material, I performed some measurements.

500mm movements along the Z axis were reproduced multiple times with a deviation of 0.00mm!  (the Z axis has a ground ball screw)

100mm movements along the X axis deviated 0.02mm.  (the X axis has a rolled ball screw).

I was delighted to note that the lathe is extremely quiet and smooth.  The only noise is some belt slap from the very old belts, and from the stepper motors.

The video below was taken from my iphone, while I was operating the lathe controls, so please excuse the erratic movements.

The steel is 27mm diameter.  750rpm, 50mm/min feeds.

And the guards will be made next step, without fail.

The G code was generated using Mach3 for these very simple shapes.  For more complex items I use Ezilathe.

 

The lathe is 600mm between centres.  38mm spindle bore.  Swing about 300mm.

Steam Engine Oilers

Knowing that I have an interest in CNC machining, Tom, from the Vintage Machinery Club in Geelong asked me to make a pair of oilers for a very old Wedlake and Dendy steam engine.  The engine is a large (to me anyway) stationary engine, which is run on steam several times each year.  The oilers for the cross slides were missing.

We searched the Internet for pictures of W&D steam engines, but could find no pictures or diagrams of the oilers.  So Tom sketched a design, and I drew a CAD diagram.  The dimensions were finally determined by the materials which I had available…  some 1.5″ brass rod and some 1.5″ copper tube.

This is the almost finished product.

IMG_4250.JPG

Just needs 1/4″ BSPT fittings and and oil wick tube so they can be fitted to the engine.

IMG_4222.JPG

The copper tube silver soldered to the brass cylinders (top), the brass blanks for the lids (bottom) and the mandrel to hold the assembly (bottom centre) during CNC turning and drilling.

IMG_4246.JPG

The mandrel to hold the body (left) and the mandrel for the lid (right).  The cap screw head and hole in the mandrel have a 2 degree taper.  The slits were cut with a 1mm thick friction blade.

IMG_4243.JPG

Rough turning the base.

IMG_4231.JPG

Turning the lid.  The mandrel is held in an ER32 collet chuck

IMG_4245.JPG

Engraving the lid.  Using a mister for cooling and lubrication.  16000rpm, 200mm/min, 90 degree TC engraving cutter.

IMG_4251.JPG

The oilers work by wicking the oil from the reservoir into a tube which drains through the base onto the engine slide.  When the wick tubes are fitted the oilers can be fitted to the engine.

IMG_3196.JPG

The 1865 Wedlake and Dendy

IMG_3195.JPG

1865

My lathe is a Boxford TCL125, using Mach3.  The G code is generated using Ezilathe.

Below is a link to an oil cup from “USS Monitor”, of American civil war fame.   One of the first ironclads, powered only by steam.

http://www.marinersmuseum.org/blog/2010/04/one-oil-cup-down/

(ps. The  lathe which I was converting to CNC was the subject of previous posts and is now working, but needs some guards fitted and a bit of fine tuning.)

OK, so guess the purpose

IMG_7699IMG_7704

A pair of sheet metal pliers, to which I welded a steel tab.   Why?

For the answer click on the link.

For some reason the auto link is not working.  You will have to type the link manually.

Later update…   I dont get this.  Even the manually typed link to the explanation does not appear.

OK.   The explanation is that these sheet metal pliers have been converted into canvas stretching pliers for my daughter who likes to make her own canvases for oil painting.  Youtube sucks sometimes.

Try searching “Thomas Baker’s canvas stretching tutorial” to see how the pliers are used.

 

 

 

 

 

 

MORE ANCIENT GREEK TECHNOLOGY, THE ANTIKYTHERA MECHANISM

This mechanism was discovered in 1901, in a Roman era shipwreck, off the Greek island of Antikythera, which is a bit north of Crete.

It has been dated to between 100BCE and 205BCE, with the older date considered the best estimate.  ie, about 2200 years old.  Experts believe that its makers were Greek.

It is currently housed in the Greek National Archeological Museum in Athens.

IMG_4180.JPG

Not much at first glance, but when it was examined with modern scanning and X ray techniques…

Look it up on Wikipedia..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antikythera_mechanism

According to the Wikipedia entry the gear teeth are too irregular to have been machine cut,

but watch the computer reconstruction.   Could you make this machine without a lathe and gear cutters?

How much more technology did the ancients have that has not survived the ravages of time?   A lathe for example.

ANCIENT GREEK MACHINING

I recently had a light globe switched on in my brain.

I was holidaying in Athens (the one in Greece), and was gobsmacked by the huge, fabulous collection of statues, mosaics, ceramics, gold jewellery and masks, bronze and iron weapons in the National Archeological Museum.   I took many photos, and might post some in later blogs.

Three items sent shivers down my spine.

  1. The gold death mask of Agamemnon (probably not Agamemnon’s but that is another story).
  2. The Antikythera machine.   More about that in a future post.
  3. A gynaecological speculum.

There was a display with many surgical instruments.  These have been found at various archeological digs in Greece, and while not precisely dated (at least not labelled) they are mostly from 500-200 BCE.

My eye was immediately drawn to an instrument which looked very familiar.  I was a gynaecologist in my previous life, and this could have come from my instruments. (except that the dark bronze surface might not have been acceptable to patients).

DSC_0570.JPG

Not a great photo, through a glass cover, and ISO cranked up to several thousand.

The instrument is labelled a vaginal dilator, but I am quite certain that it is a vaginal speculum.  A speculum is used to inspect the vaginal walls and uterine cervix.  (That might be too much information my metal working/ engine making/ machinery minded readers.  If so, too bad.)

It is said to be made of bronze.  The Ancient Greeks were highly skilled at metal casting, as evidenced by the many complex and beautiful bronze statues and weapons and implements on display.

It interested me for several reasons.  Bear in mind that not many archeology museum visitors are gynaecologists who know about making threads in metal.

It looks quite functional, and if cleaned up, given a shiny surface and sterilized it could be used today.

The threaded section is very regular and smooth.  I would loved to have taken some measurements of the thread with a micrometer, but had to be content with a prolonged inspection through the glass case.  The thread appears to me to be so regular, that it could not have been hand filed.  It must have been machine made.  I have seen hand made threads on medieval machines, and they are crude compared with this one.

Either this is not an ancient Greek instrument but a more modern instrument accidentally included in the display (pretty unlikely, considering the professionalism of the people involved).  (ps.  If you Google Pompeii speculum, you will see that similar instruments have been unearthed at Pompeii…  buried since 79ce.)

Or…..  the ancient Greeks had screw cutting lathes.

Ridiculous you say?

Wait until my next post about the Antikythera machine.  If if you just cannot wait, look it up.   It is mind blowing.

 

 

CNC Lathe conversion -16

The wiring of the lathe is complete.  (Except for limit switches.  They can be added at any time).

Mach 3 is configured.  The wireless hand control is installed and working.  Ezilathe installed and waiting for input.

Some covers to be made.

IMG_4154

Hook ups in progress.  That’s the faulty VSD on top of the electronics enclosure.  The CNC engineer lost his hair trying to figure out the problem.

Still some testing and fine tuning required.

But nothing much will happen in the workshop for the next  3 weeks.

 

 

CNC lathe conversion -15

Another couple of advances in the conversion.  Today I installed the lead screw cover and the cable protector to the cross slide stepper motor.

The cable protector was easy and straightforward. It flexes in one direction only, and is fixed at the ends after the cable is threaded through it.  The length is adjusted by adding or removing links.  It was placed so that coolant liquid will drain out of it, and to minimise the accumulation of swarf.   The cables themselves have a thick covering and are well protected.  The link protector will not kink, further protecting the cable.

It was cheap.  About $AUD20 for 2 meters, posted from China.  I used about 1.1m.

cnc lathe - 2.jpg

Showing the stepper motor cable protector, and the lead screw protector (one half of it.  The other half is on the other side of the carriage.)

The lead screw protector was another story.  It is a spring steel coil, about 50mm wide, and as it is compressed the coils fit inside each other.  I made a big mistake in allowing it to spring open before I had installed it (there were no instructions).  It immediately opened to a length of over a meter, in coils about 50-60mm diameter.   No big deal, I thought.  I will just compress it back to its original configuration.    Big mistake.

It was what I imagine coiling a live, oily, biting, boa constrictor would be like.  (OK, boas constrict rather than bite.  How about an anaconda, or a big eel.)

I fought it for about an hour.  And eventually succeeded.  Minus a few bits of my skin.

So I did not allow the protectors to expand again until after I had them on the lead screw.

This is what they look like.   Pretty cool IMO.  They just expanded into position when I removed the restraining clips.

cnc lathe - 3.jpg

The lead screw stepper motor and protector.  The Estop box above will get some ends to exclude swarf.

It was not cheap.  The best price that I could find was from South Korea.  $AUD200 inc postage.  But it is excellent Japanese quality.

The wiring is happening, but the variable speed drive seems to be dead.  It has been sitting unused on a shelf for 2 years, so no point asking about warranty.  Took it apart to check for broken wires, fuses, burnt out components etc, but nothing visible.  Will order another one.  About $AUD200.  An unexpected expense.

 

CNC lathe conversion -14

These lathe CNC conversion posts are probably becoming a bit tiresome, but just in case there is someone out there who is interested, I will continue until the job is finished.

The latest was to make and install a spindle speed (and position – thanks David M) sensor.  It consists of a disk with a slot cut in the periphery, attached to the main spindle.  And an opto-electronic sensor which is connected to its own electronic board, thence to the breakout board and VSD.

cnc lathe - 1.jpg

The disc with the slot at 8:30 and the sensor at 9:00.  I must have chosen the wrong cutter or turning speed for that disc aluminium…  looks a bit rough.  (note added 13/7    Stuart T says that I should have used coolant-lubricant).

cnc lathe - 4.jpg

View from above.  Any clearer?   That gear is now superfluous except as a spacer.

So there is one electronic impulse per spindle revolution.  That is enough to measure the RPM’s.   Essential for cutting threads.

The beauty of this system is that there is no gear selection or changing, and ANY thread pitch can be selected…  metric, imperial, BA  etc…  any odd ball thread that your heart desires.

cnc lathe - 2

cnc lathe - 3

The HTD (high torque drive, I am informed by many readers) pulleys and belts and taper lock fittings.  Unfortunately I could not find a taper lock to fit the small pulleys, so when it is all finally, definitely, absolutely, correctly,  positioned, I will Loctite them in position.  Protective covers yet to be made.  I quite like to see the mechanicals in action, so I am intending to make the covers from clear polycarbonate.(Lexan) .

CNC Lathe conversion -13

IMG_4125

Adjusting the lead screw.

The 48 tooth HTD pulley has been installed using a taper lock.

Then some time was spent adjusting the parallelism of the lead screw.  That requires quite a few movements of the carriage along the 600mm thread.  Each 360 degree turn of the lead screw advances the carriage 6mm, so you can understand that I became a bit impatient with all of the repetitive hand actions to move the carriage from one end to the other.

So this was a solution to that issue.  That HTD belt is the one that was too long, so I was happy to find a use for it.    The variable speed battery drill shot the carriage end to end in a couple of seconds.

All is now adjusted parallel.

A few more little installation issues, then for the wiring.

CNC Lathe conversion -12

Today I fitted the lead screw.

No big deal, I sense that you are thinking.  After all, the ends are machined, the bearings fitted, and all waits in readiness.

True, but there is a strict sequence of events.  And since it has been 3 or more weeks since it has been together, I had to rediscover the sequence, by trial and error.  And each bit of the fitting is very heavy, very delicate, very tricky.  So it took me several hours to get to the  final photo in this blog.

But first a view of the inside of the newly machined apron.

IMG_4122.jpg

 

IMG_4123.JPG

The lead screw fitted.  The cross slide screw is also fitted.  Note the red E Stop panic button fitted to the left.    Next job is to fit a support bearing at the right hand end of the screw.  Then to check and adjust parallelism of the screws.  A rough check showed that they are within 0.25mm

CNC Lathe conversion -11. Ball screw machining.

Hooray!

Today I collected the lead screw after the ends were machined by Statewide Linear Bearings.

I decided to drive the 100km each way to pick it up, in preference to using a courier.  I wanted to ensure that all of the small bits were there, and also just to make sure it was handled properly.  Mostly freeway, listening to Dan Carlin on the Persian-Greek wars, so it was a pleasant way  to have 3-4 hours to myself.  (If you do not know about Dan Carlin, Google him and download an episode.  If history at school had been like this, we would all be history addicts.)

IMG_4117.JPG

This is the lead screw, ends machined, and support bearings fitted.  1100mm long. 28mm dia

All good, except that the nut was back to front.  That nut is pre-tensioned, which means that the 2 halves are separated by a precisely machined washer.  I was nervous about removing it and replacing it the correct way around.  However I had previously asked the ball screw expert about that aspect, so armed with the technique I made up a sleeve of the correct size, removed the nut and replaced it.   No balls fell out.   So all good!  The above picture shows the nut in its correct position.

IMG_4118.JPG

The nut.  Looks expensive?  Is expensive.  And beautiful.

IMG_4120.JPG

The machined driven end.   $AUD250 machining there.  But it is perfectly done.

IMG_4119.JPG

And with the support bearing installed.  A pulley for the HTD belt goes on the distal bit of shaft.

 

IMG_4112

The CNC lathe has 3 belts. There is a V belt from the 3 phase motor to the main lathe spindle.  Although I changed the motor and the pulleys, the old belt fitted, which was good.  No hassle. But the stepper motors driving the lead screw and cross slide screw, and their pulleys were all […]

CNC Lathe conversion – 9

The CNC lathe conversion has been happening, despite no posts on the blog.

I have mounted the electronics enclosure, and mounted the various components inside.  No wiring yet.

IMG_4110

This stainless steel tool box is the electronics enclosure.  It fits the space quite nicely, and is adequately big.  The back gear cover to the right will be retained, although the back gears have been discarded.  The main switch and emergency stop will be mounted somewhere on this cover.

IMG_4109

The Variable speed drive (VSD) sits on top.  That will control the spindle speed.  The transformers, stepper motor drives, and Breakout board (the heart of the system) are positioned inside.  Plus cooling fan and filters.  Ready for wiring.

IMG_4107

Drilling the apron to attach the cross slide ball screw bearing.  One chance only at this one, so the setting up took a couple of hours.  The apron is clamped to a large angle bracket on the milling table.   M6 threading followed.

IMG_4108

The end result.  The bearing as attached to the apron and the ball screw is in place.  I machined the end of this ball screw to fit the bearing, cut a thread (M10x1), and machined the end to accept the pulley.  All good.  There is 0.25mm adjustment available if required, but it all seems pretty correct.  The bearing sits on a carefully machined block which is 7.85mm thick.   Still waiting the lead screw machining.(!!)