johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Tag: Titanic

Triple Expansion Steam Engine Pipework.

I am close to disassembling the Bolton 9, before gradually reassembling it in preparation for running it on air then steam.  Most of the components have now been made.  Most recently I completed the pipework associated with the Edwards air pump and the twin water pumps.

IMG_4997

This is the combined air and water pumps, and new pipework.  Most joins are silver soldered, but a couple are Loctited.  Loctite should be adequate.  These components will not get super hot.

IMG_4999

This valve is one of the few components on this engine which I have not personally made.  This one came from the effects of the late Harry Close, who was a valued member of our Model Engineering Club.

IMG_5002

The pipework adds to the overall interest , yes?  It will look good when polished.

IMG_5001

And the “tails” for the valve rods, which are attached to their respective steam chests.  The BA7 bolts are a bit oversized for the job.  The intermediate cylinder tail screws into place.  I am not sure why it is different from the other two.

So now I am making a list of tasks which need to be completed when the engine is taken apart, hopefully for the last time before it is run.  The list is not complete, and so far it runs to 3 pages.  Mostly like fixing parts which interfere with each other, and freeing up tight bearings.

I will take some pics of the components.

TRIPLE EXPANSION STEAM ENGINE ANIMATION

This is a very nice animation and summary of the triple expansion engines and steam turbine on the Titanic.

Note that the triple expansion engines  have 4 cylinders.  There are 2 low pressure cylinders.

Be prepared to hit the pause button on some of the old photos.

STEAM CHESTS for TRIPLE

The time which I have had spare in the past few days has been spent tidying up the workshop,  sorting tools and putting them away.  Today I spent a few hours making a start on the intermediate and low pressure steam chests.

Roughed them out and CNC’d a boss on the bottom of each chest.  Then roughed out the steam chest covers.

This is the progress to date.

IMG_2574

So far I have drilled, tapped and inserted ~180 BA7 screws and studs. And there are a lot more to go. The steam chests and covers are sitting on the base.

Attaching the cylinder block bases to the cylinder blocks was tricky.  I drilled the holes with the bases glued to the blocks using Loctite, and then tapped the holes and inserted the screws.  I will apply some heat to break down the Loctite.

It is quite difficult to insert the screws to the underside of the block.  Many are quite inaccessible.  There have been multiple tear downs of the model, with many more to go, so only a small number of screws are currently inserted.  I will have to work out an order of assembly, to make the assembly process as logical and easy as possible.

I am starting to consider which method I will use to make the crankshaft.  It has 6 main bearings, 3 big end bearings, and locations for 3 valve eccentrics and an oil pump.  It is quite complex.  Fabricate or turn from the solid.  I am tending to the latter, but we will see.

Triple progress

Today I made the BA7 studs for the columns on the triple expansion steam engine.  I decided to use 25mm bolts, then trim them to length after they were installed into the threaded holes.  Why not use threaded rod or make my own studs on the CNC lathe I hear you asking?  Well, I could have made my own studs.  In fact I did make 2 studs, quite succesfully.  But it was time consuming.  Cutting up threaded rod would have worked, but it turned out to be less expensive to buy over length bolts which are threaded right down to the heads, and trim them to length, than to buy threaded rod.  Plus, the trimmed bolts are now quite useable 12mm bolts.   Also, it was easy to use the bolt hex head to screw them into the threaded holes.

I did manage to break off one stud and spent a half hour or so digging the stub out and renewing the stud.  But no permanent damage.

IMG_2495

The BA7 25mm bolts are screwed into place, and held there with with a nut.  The saw blade was attached to a 200mm long arbor which was shop made for the job, shown here about to trim the bolts to length, on the milling machine.

IMG_2497

The studs are trimmed to length, and the columns are sitting in place, temporarily held with 4 nuts each. 9 studs and nuts is total overkill, over- engineering, but it looks the part, no?

IMG_2496

After fiddling with the minute BA 7 studs and nuts, trying not to go nutty myself, I had some fun rough machining the lump of brass which is to become the low and intermediate pressure cylinders.

Machining the columns on the Titanic Engine Model

IMG_2460

Deep drilling using CNC. The last hole was drilled manually, with problems. CNC rules OK!

A warm day today. Too hot to wear a shirt in the workshop. But no metal splinters from machining the brass and aluminium, and only one hiccup, which will be described.
The jig which I started yesterday, needed 9 more accurately positioned holes drilled and tapped M4.
So I programmed the CNC mill, only to discover that there is a limit of 8 holes able to be programmed. So the final hole would have to be separately positioned, and that was the cause of my problem.
Firstly, the 8 holes were deep drilled (30mm deep, 4mm diameter) after centre drilling. All done with the CNC.
All went beautifully. 2mm pecks, some cutting fluid brushed on.
Then I used the CNC to position the last hole, and centre drilled it manually, AND BROKE THE CENTRE DRILL IN THE JIG!!!
I did not want to remove the jig from the vice, because it was all accurately set up. But I could not see the broken high speed steel tip, so I removed the jig, and tried to dig out the broken tip. Unsuccesfully.
So the next method was to use an old carbide end mill, 4.5mm diameter, to drill into the hole and to break up the high speed steel fragment. That method worked, but at the cost of enlarging the accurately placed but incompletely drilled hole. Next step was to reposition the jig in the milling vice, then deeply countersink the hole, then complete the 4mm drilling operation. It seemed OK, but it later became obvious that the hole had moved about 0.5mm from where it was intended. I eventually used a carbide end mill to enlarge the entire hole, in the correct position, at 4.5mm diameter.  All a bit messy, but not fatal.

IMG_2464

The jig halves opened up, and the drilling positions which were entered into the CNC instructions.

Then the columns were drilled and tapped.  2 attachment points per column, so with 3 holes per column in the jig, there are 2 possible positions for each column in the jig.

IMG_2467

The columns to be attached to the jig.

A column on the wedges in the milling vice, rea

A column on the wedge in the milling vice, ready to be drilled and tapped.

IMG_2469

The columns screwed to the jig.

IMG_2470

2 columns are integrated with the condensing unit.

Re “Titanic” engine heading…   I get a lot more hits on this blog if I include the word Titanic.  OK?

IMG_2472

Now that all columns are attached in their final position on the jig, I can start hacking into them to produce some flat surfaces

IMG_2475

The columns sitting on the base in their correct position, using the jig.

IMG_2474

LP is the column for the low pressure, biggest cylinder. HP is the column for the high pressure, smallest cylinder. IP is intermediate. C is for the steam condenser.

MILLING THE COLUMNS for THE BOLTON 9 MARINE ENGINE

90% setup time, 10% machining.

The columns are tapered on all faces, so are difficult to hold, and difficult to measure.

I did a CAD drawing, to measure the taper angles, and to calculate some extra dimensions.

Then, in order to hold the castings in the milling vice, I made some accurate wedges at the appropriate angles (3 and 12 degrees) in wood and aluminium.

I actually progressed a bit further than the photos show, even roughing out the condensing tank.

IMG_2319

IMG_2317

The aluminium wedges have a 12 degree taper. The top wedge is sitting on a 10 degree and a 2 degree precision taper, giving an accurate 12 degree slope for milling. I made 2 such wedges, each 100mm long.

IMG_2318

Unmachined casting on right. Partly machined on left. Quite difficult to set up, despite the setp up blocks at the appropriate angles.

GSMEE EXHIBITION 2

Wimshurst Electrostatic Generator, made by Peter Bodman.  Creates sparks up to 100mm long, which drill minute holes in interposed paper sheets.  No-one volunteered to ry it with a hand.

Wimshurst Electrostatic Generator, made by Peter Bodman. Creates sparks up to 100mm long, which drill minute holes in interposed paper sheets. No-one volunteered to try it with their own hand.

IMG_2238

Vacuum engine made by Peter Bodman.

IMG_2263

Awesome model of pre-dreadnaught ship circa 1902 “Preussen” made by Walter. It is approx 1 meter long, weighs 16kg, and is radio controlled. The 28cm gun turrets are also radio controlled, but do not (as far as I know) actually fire.  To the right is a model of Columbus’s “Santa Maria”.

IMG_2264

The detail in the model has to be seen to be believed.  Every plank of the decking is individually made and fitted.

IMG_2284

Walter showed us the inside construction, engines, and electronics. The model was made from a few old photographs, and simple side and top elevations.

IMG_2285

Hull with the superstructure removed

IMG_2241

A very old pressure gauge, restored so that the workings are displayed, to reveal how it works. By Stuart.

IMG_2259

This model boat was made by 8 year old Niall, with some supervision from his Dad, William. The gun is actually a radio controlled water cannon which fires up to 3 meters, to the wet surprise of some spectators. Niall and William both had a fantastic experience with this project.

IMG_2262

William with some of the wonderful boat and ship models which he (and Niall) have made in recent years.

IMG_2249

A model working ship steam engine and boiler, by Walter. Twin cylinder, double acting cylinders. This should be jewellery, worn around the neck of a beautiful woman.  OK, that is a little over the top, but you get the idea

 

IMG_2250

Close up of the marine engine by Walter

IMG_2277

Les Madden with his partly completed Atkinson Differential Engine Model, originally patented in 1887. The wooden model on the left was built by Les in attempt to figure out how it worked! He made the wooden parts to have aluminium castings made.

IMG_2278

Les Madden’s Differential engine.

18 radial cylinder aero engine, by John Ramm.  The hand carved propeller is approx 600mm long.

18 radial cylinder aero engine, by John Ramm. The hand carved propeller is approx 600mm long.

IMG_2253

Detail of the aero engine. John showed 3 aero engines. He is currently making a 12 cylinder Spitfire Merlin engine which he will have finished by the time of the 2015 exhibition.

IMG_2281

Stuart Tankard’s prize winning hit and miss engine, was running throughout the exhibition. 17.7cc, 4 stroke, 4:1 compression, running on gas.

IMG_2282

Close up detail of the hit and miss engine. A standard the rest of us can aim for.

IMG_2283

A vertical boiler made by Stuart Tankard

Thomas Lord in the cabin of his steam truck, giving some driving tips to Niall

Thomas Lord in the cabin of his steam truck, giving some driving tips to Niall

These photos are just a small fraction of the many model engines, ships, trains, tools and other projects created and displayed by members and friends of GSMEE.

TRIPLE EXPANSION MARINE STEAM ENGINE 3

I had almost 8 hours in the workshop today.  The base plate is progressing.

 

Sheet 1 of 3

Sheet 1 of 3

Milling the main bearing housing slots

Milling the main bearing housing slots.  Using a 14mm HSS end cutter.  Ended up blunt.  There must be some embedded casting sand still

Then I spent an hour or so painting the machined surfaces with marking blue, and marking reference points and edges.

Using a Knu vice to cramp the base plate to and angle plate, and a height gauge to mark the reference lines

Using a Knu vice to cramp the base plate to and angle plate, and a height gauge to mark the reference lines

Top view of the marking out lines

Top view of the marking out lines

After machining the main bearing housings, the big end slots and the eccentric slots.

After machining the main bearing housings, the big end slots and the eccentric slots.

TRIPLE EXPANSION MARINE ENGINE 2

Reducing the width of the aluminium plate to 140mm, so it will fit into my milling vice

Reducing the width of the aluminium plate to 140mm, so it will fit into my milling vice.  The plate is clamped to an angle plate.

Squaring the ends.

Squaring the ends.

IMG_2153

The base plate bolted to the aluminium plate. Care was taken to fix the brass base centrally and parallel to the aluminium. The fixing bolts are 3mm cap screws, and the holes through the brass plate are 3mm, so even if the brass base is removed, it will go back on in exactly the same position.

IMG_2154

I finished the day by making a spur gear for my brother’s lathe.

 

The gear attached to the shaft using Loctite.  If the Loctite is inadequate, the gear can be pinned to the shaft.   In the post tomorrow, to Townsville QLD.

The gear attached to the shaft using Loctite. If the Loctite is inadequate, the gear can be pinned to the shaft. In the post tomorrow, to Townsville QLD.  The photo shows why metalworking is an unsuitable hobby for a gynaecologist.

TRIPLE EXPANSION STEAM ENGINE 1

The base casting.

The base casting.

The base of the base, machined flat

The base of the base, machined flat

The base, with 6 pillar mounting areas machined parallel & coplanar, and the crankshaft mounting blocks after an initial skimming.

The base, with 6 pillar mounting areas machined parallel & coplanar, and the crankshaft mounting blocks after an initial skimming.  Slots for big ends roughed out.  2 hour first machining session.  2998 hours to go?

After carefully examining the base casting, and scrutinising the plans to discover all of the dimensions of the base, I commenced machining on my King Rich mill (Bridgeport clone, NT40 with DRO, an excellent machine). Since the base dimensions are scattered over 3 pages of very complex plans, and I am still relatively unfamiliar with them, I am approaching the machining with great caution. At this stage I am aiming to create some flat and coplanar surfaces, with a margin of material remaining, so I can hold the base flat, without rocking, roughing out the shape, and leaving finishing to dimensions at a later date. I intend to attach the base to a rectangular piece of aluminium, so the aluminium can be clamped or held in a vice, rather than risking damaging the brass casting.

CASTINGS ARRIVE AT LAST!!

Today I received a 16.6kg package by courier. It was too heavy for the regular post.  It contained the castings for the model triple expansion steam engine, which I am hoping to build in the next year or so.  I am told that on average this model takes 3000 hours to complete.  That is a scary thought.  Almost unbelievable.  But when I calculate how many hours went into the much simpler single cylinder beam engine (maybe 600-800), I guess that it is not an unrealistic estimate.  Just as well that I am close to retirement age.

The castings were made in NSW Australia, and supplied by Kelly Mayberry at EJ Winter.

All carefully wrapped

All carefully wrapped

The castings are all brass, gunmetal, or bronze

The castings are all brass or gunmetal.  There must be at least 100 of them.

Looks like the condensor chamber, as part of the engine frame.

Looks like the condensor chamber, as part of the engine frame.

The base.

The base.

A large chunk of brass

A large chunk of brass, the intermediate and low pressure cylinders.

The castings appear to be free of holes or defects

The castings appear to be free of holes or defects

Bolton 9 Triple Expansion Steam Engine

My next steam engine project will be to make from iron and gunmetal castings and bar stock, a steam engine which will have similarities to the engines of the Titanic.  It will have 3 cylinders, increasing in size, so that steam passes from the smallest to the intermediate to the biggest, thus being used 3 times before being exhausted.  It will be much more complex than the other engines pictured to date on the blog.  My other engines have taken about a year each to build, so I predict that this one will take a similar time.  We will see.  There will be no rush.  My aim is to enjoy the build and end up with a working engine.  It might even end up in a boat.

I have the plans, and the castings are on order.  The supplier (Kelly Mayberry at E&J Winter, Sydney) had to order new castings, so they are currently being cast and collected.  My next post will be when the castings arrive.  If you are interested, go to the E&J Winter web site and browse the catalogue.  I am not exactly sure about the final cost of the castings but it will be approx $A1500.  Not cheap, but SWMBO says that it keeps me off the streets, and is probably less than belonging to a golf club.