johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Triple retrospective

This post is for reader Roy, who asked how the triple expansion engine columns and base and cylinder blocks were aligned, and also about joint sealants.

To be honest, I did not really remember the details, but the posts on or close to Feb 2015 include the following photos.  The aluminium plates were precisely machined keep the column faces exactly separated by the final width.  The plates were bolted to the columns, then to each other.   I lined up the join in the plates with the center of the main bearing housings in the base plate.

The longitudinal alignment with the cylinder bores was determined by the precise drilling in the tops of the columns, and the cylinder base covers.  And a little longitudinal movement in the crankshaft allowed for a few thou discepancy.

IMG_2495

 

 

And this is what I used to steam proof the joins.  I used no gaskets.  The Loctite 567.  It was recommended by an expert friend who uses it on full size steam engines (thanks Tom!).  The Loxeal 58.11 is also excellent but it sets very hard, and is very difficult to separate later.

 

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BOILER FOR MODEL STEAM ENGINES

Now that the model triple expansion engine is working on steam, I feel able to put it aside, again, and move onto the next project.  The triple is not quite finished.  It needs cylinder lagging, control rods for the cylinder drain cocks, drain tubes for the cylinder drains, and an extra pump for the condenser cooling, and some paint, possibly.

It also needs a boiler.  I would like to exhibit the triple at club demonstrations and public exhibitions, but for that I need a boiler which is certified by our boiler safety authority.  So I intend to make a boiler to AMBSC code, and big enough for the triple or any other engines which I might make in the foreseeable future.

This is what I have in mind….

boiler assembly

This is a copper boiler with a 152mm (6″) diameter barrel, a superheater, gas or coal fueled, and firetubes (most not shown).  The plans call for a 5″ barrel, but I have been unable to find any suitable copper tube, and I have some 6″, so that is what will be used.  I am currently drawing up the plans.

The certification process here in Australia requires the following steps:

  1. Preliminary discussion with the boiler inspector (done)
  2. Submission of 2 sets of plans to the boiler inspector.  If acceptable, one set is signed off and stamped and returned.  The other set is held by the inspector.
  3. Inspection of the prepared components by the inspector prior to soldering/brazing/welding.
  4. Inspection of the firebox and tube assembly after soldering/brazing/welding.
  5. Inspection of the barrel and outer wrapper after soldering/brazing/welding.
  6. Testing the boiler after completion.  This involves a hydrostatic test, at double working pressure for 20 minutes, then a steam test at 10% above working pressure.

If it passes, the boiler is certified for 12 months, after which it must be retested.  If it passes the retest it is certified for 3 years.

The certification process is performed by volunteer inspectors attached to model engineering clubs, and is done at no cost.

However the materials for a boiler like this are quite costly.  I managed to obtain some  copper tube for the wrapper, and bought some copper plate for the firebox and boiler ends on Ebay.  Bronze for the bushes from a local bearing supplier (LG2), and firetube copper tube from local plumbing supplies.  All up, so far, is approaching $AUD1000.  And yet to be factored is the safety valve, various cocks, sight gauge, hand pump silver solder.  And I intend to make and fit a steam driven feeder pump, and possibly a steam injector.

If there is any interest in this project I will post progress notes and photos.  Let me know.

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