johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Tag: making an ER40 chuck

The Robert the Bruce approach to turning problems.

Robert the Bruce was watching a spider making a web in the cave they were sharing, so the story goes.  The spider tried 6 times to make a difficult connection, and on the 7th attempt, it succeeded.  Robert, who had tried many times to become king of the Scots, was inspired to try yet again, and he did indeed become King Robert 1 of Scotland, eventually.

I thought of Robert more than once recently, when I was making an ER40 collet chuck for my CNC lathe.  The particular  collet chuck involved making a 2.25″ x 8tpi internal thread, a 50mm x 1.5mm external thread, and cutting an 8 degree internal taper.   Not too complicated you say.  I agree, but for the chuck to be useful, each step had to be extremely accurate.

I made 4 successive collet chucks until one was adequately accurate.

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CHUCK 1, 2 and 3

Chuck 1 actually went very well.   Nice tight spindle thread, taper good, and external thread just right.  But the chuck did not quite seat firmly.  Could it be that the spindle thread (the internal one) was not quite long enough?   So I cut a deep distal groove.    Wound out the carriage.   Oh shit!   Forgot to clear the spindle thread.   Totally destroyed it.   The chuck actually fitted the spindle quite nicely, but with only 10% of the thread remaining, it was useless.

Chuck 2 was made in 2 pieces, on suggestion from Stuart T.  The idea being that if there was any inaccuracy in the lateral runout, the piece with the taper could be adjusted.  OK.   Sounded sensible.  Again all went well, but the spindle thread was not correct.  For some reason the thread cutter seemed to make a new path about half way through making the thread.   So the spindle thread was thinned  excessively.   But still tight.   So I made the tapered half, and joined it all together.  Fitted it to the lathe and measured the runout and taper.  All good.  Less than 0.01mm runout and perfectly parallel to 100mm from the chuck face.   But.   The next day I removed the chuck, replaced it, and did the runout measurements again.  I did not need a gauge.  I could see the wobble.  Chucked the chuck  into the rubbish bin.  That thinnned out spindle thread was hopeless.   But what caused the problem?  The thread was CNC cut, and it should have been perfect.

So chuck 3.   One piece again.    All seemed to go well, but again the big spindle thread was wrong.    Again there seemed to be 2 thread paths.

Then the penny dropped.   The spider made the web connection.   Robert got the throne and John saw the light.

The tool post had moved slightly during the threading!  It had twisted a little, as a result of the T piece in the carriage slipping.  F**K    F**K  F**K!!!

I replaced the T piece grub screws with more solid cap screws, and really tightened them.  Then made another chuck.    I must point out that each chuck was about 6-8 hours of machining, normally a very pleasant time.  But by this time, I felt like that  bloody spider in the cave.

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ER40 Chuck Number 4.

One advantage of making 4 chucks is that each one was made faster, and with more confidence.   This one was made in about 5-6 hours, including painting with selenium oxide to give it a black appearance.

It has a runout at the chuck face of 0 – 0.01mm (which might have been due to inaccuracy in the rod which was being measured), and a taper of 0.02mm at 50mm from the chuck face.  It feels nice and tight when being screwed on.   OK,  Success.   Eventually.

Next job, the throne of Scotland.

But obviously that slipping top slide on the CNC lathe has to follow chucks 1,2 and 3 into the rubbish bin.   It will be replaced by a fixed, immoveable tool post.

A Full Size Weighshaft

The crowds were down at this year’s Truck Show at the Geelong Showgrounds.  Maybe the  38c weather prediction had something to do with that.

But those hardy souls who did turn up were treated to a feast of steam engines working on steam, and other antique engines popping away, as well as the magnificent trucks, tactors, and military vehicles.  There was a superb display of radio controlled trucks and excavators, and unbelievable machinery created with Meccano.

My interest was mainly focussed, for some reason, on the full sized triple expansion steam engine, which is the prize display in the vintage machinery shed.  it once powered a tug boat, and later a dredge on Port Phillip Bay.   And the following photos and video, if it will upload, show the bits which were of particular interest.

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The red control handle top right is the main steam control valve.  The one on the left is the reversing control handle.  Note the big steam piston centre bottom.  It is a steam powered reversing control piston.   This engine was made in 1951, so is just about the last gasp in triple expansion steam engine development.

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and the rod at top is about 5″ diameter.  It is the weighshaft, which carries the reversing levers for each cylinder.  On my model it is 5mm diameter.

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Another view of the weighshaft and the levers.   Massive.

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And note the drag links in the adjustable block.   That would have been set at intitial installation, and probably never altered since then.

Video of the big triple expansion engine working.  Maybe not.

For those following my triple expansion steam model engine build, I have put it aside again.  It is at the final assembly stage now.

Meanwhile, I am making some extra tool holders for the CNC lathe, and another ER40 chuck for the CNC lathe.

The ER40 chuck which I am currently using has an M5 shaft which is held with a drawbar, so I cannot feed work through the lathe spindle.  Plus it sticks out of the headstock a bit excessively.  So I have drawn up plans for a new chuck which I will fit to the lathe spindle and use the CNC to make the ER40 taper and threads.  Pics will follow.

And I really need some extra tool holders for the CNC lathe.  I have 5, but have material to make another 10.   The material is high quality cast iron off a scrapped T&C grinder.  I bought the grinder table cheaply (($AUD20 from memory) and have been gradually canibalising it over the last couple of years.   I have cut up the remains into rectangular 30x80x40mm chunks and will make the tool holders in the next couple of days, SWMBO and weather permitting.  Unfortunately there was insufficient material to make a long section, machine it, then cut it up, so each tool holder will have to be made separately.