johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Tag: model engine

Trevithick Dredger Engine….progress

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Finishing bits on the engine assembly.  The stuffing box, the gland, and a threaded plug in the throttle cylinder.  Throttle valve, stem direction valve,  piston and piston rod next.

MODEL ENGINES in the cage at the GEELONG SHOW

The following short videos show some of the engines on display by GSMEE in the Vintage Machinery Shed at the recent Geelong Show.  GSMEE is Geelong Society of Model and Experimental Engineers.  All engines are running on steam, except of course the Stirling engine,  the Farmboy, and the Atkinson engine.

These engines will be running again at the GSMEE exhibition 25-26 Nov 2017, at The Lifestyle Pavillion, The Geelong Showgrounds.  Several scale model traction engines, trade exhibits, outside entries, and the engines in the Vintage Machinery Shed will also be on show.  The Hatherly Challenge competition will be judged.  This year the challenge is to make a reversing horizontal mill engine.  Entry is free (gold coin donation accepted with gratitude).

Stirling Engine, running on heat from exhausted steam,  spinning a CD with spiral image, made by John V.

 

 

Stuart Victoria Twin, made by Malcom W

 

 

Bolton12 Beam Engine made by John V

 

 

Farmboy internal combustion engine, running on propane, made by Stuart T

 

 

Horizontal Mill Engine running on steam, reconditioned by John V,  (GSMEE exhibit)

 

 

Atkinson Engine, running on petrol, made by Rudi V.  FIRST PRIZE.

 

 

Stuart 5, running on steam.  Reconditioned by Rudi V.  GSMEE exhibit.

 

 

Beam Engine “Mary”, completed by Stuart T.  THIRD PRIZE.

 

 

Mill Engine, running on steam GSMEE exhibit.

 

 

Mill Engine running on steam.  GSMEE exhibit.

 

 

Mill Engine, running on steam, made by Malcolm W.

 

 

Triple expansion marine steam engine by John V.  Almost completed.  SECOND PRIZE.

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The Steam Supply Valve

This valve is the one which opens the steam supply from the boiler to the engine.  Triple expansion sgeam engines require a minimum of 100 psi, and preferably 120-200psi.  But amteur built boilers are rarely certified above 100 psi.

But compressed air gets to 120 psi with no drama.  So guess what will power this engine until I get around to making a high pressure boiler.

So the on-off valve needs to be pretty solid, so it does not explode and send hot fragments of metal in all directions.

Here is the main supply valve as specified and built for my triple expansion steam engine.

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The lines in the background are a ruled exercise book, just to give a sense of the scale.  There are 9 components of precision machined components in this picture.  And about 2-3,  8-12 hr very happy days in the workshop to make.  This is all made from bar stock.

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And this is the handle which controls the on – off steam supply.  Pretty sexy hey?

It all attaches to the high pressure steam chest and cylinder.

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Hey!  I like this shit stuff .  Even if most of the rest of humanity is yawning.


 

Triple Expansion Steam Engine resumes

Busy at this time of the year.

Making some wooden toys for the grandchildren for Xmas.

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Not sure whether these are ducks or chooks.  My talented wife brings them to life with colours.  When pushed by 1-2 year olds they waddle with an entertaining flap flap walk.  

Preparing the surgery building for sale.  Removing and storing 34+ years of medical records, moving furniture, arranging repairs and painting etc etc.  Feels strange to be no longer a registered medical practitioner, but I know that it was the correct decision to retire.  It has taken 2 years to totally burn the bridges by dropping my medical registration, and selling the surgery etc.

Model Engineering Club annual exhibition.

 

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This model quartz crusher at the exhibition was driven by a hit and miss engine.

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Another superb engine at our exhibition.

Plus ongoing military history book reading and reviews.

Slashing long grass, to reduce the summer fire risk.

Assembling and installing a kitchen into a rental property.

So it was a treat to get some time in the workshop today.  I had previously made the layshaft brackets for the triple expansion steam engine, so I spent a happy few hours setting up an angle jig on the milling machine to drill and tap holes to attach the brackets.

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This is the setup.  An adjustable angle plate was bolted to the milling table, and the angle was set so the columns were horizontal.  The layshaft brackets were Super glued to the columns with the shaft in place after filing to get the brackets quite level.  The holes were spotted through, then drilled (1.6mm) and tapped (2mm).

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The layshaft bolted in position with M2 nuts and studs.  M2 is very similar to BA7, and a lot less expensive, and is stainless steel.  Way to go!

 

Triple Rest

I have put the triple expansion steam engine build to one side for a while.  There are many parts made over the past year, but still a few to go, and I am taking a rest from it.

My modelling club is conducting a competition to build a Stirling cycle engine, and I have decided to make an entry.  It is the coffee cup engine by Jan Ridders.  It is an annual Stirling cycle competition.  I made an entry last year, but I couldn’t get it to work.  So I am determined to make this one work.

I am also using the Koffiekop engine project to become more familiar with the CNC machining processes.  So I am making as many components as possible using CNC.  For simple parts this often takes longer than using a manual process, but my CNCing is definitely becoming faster and easier, and crashes and tooling breakages are now rare.

The Koffiekop is progressing well, and I will post some pics and maybe a video when I get it working.

MODEL ENGINEERING EXHIBITION at BENDIGO, VICTORIA, AUSTRALIA

Bendigo is a beautiful city in the middle of Victoria, with a rich history, literally!

The city is in the “golden triangle” of Victoria, named for the huge quantities of gold which were mined from the area in the second half of the nineteenth century.

With that mining-engineering background, it is not too surprising that Bendigo has an enthusiastic and active metalworking, engineering, modelling club, and every two years they host an exhibition, which I attended for the first time last weekend.  And what a terrific event it was.   Well worth the 3 hours each way drive.

Following are some photos of a few of the hundreds of exhibits.  Please forgive me if I don’t remember some of the names and details.  The standard of the work varied from excellent to absolutely bloody unbelievable.

Welcoming visitors at the entrance, was Gerard Dean, with his 1/5 scale Tiger tank, powered by a V12 150cc engine.  Belching smoke, and overcoming any obstacles and visitors in its way.  There are a few of these models around the world, but very very few have a 12 cylinder gasoline engine which looks and sounds the part.  Gerard has taken his model to many countries, including the USA.  He does occasionally strike a hitch at customs, and usually has to prove that it will not fire real ammunition. The country which gave him the hardest time getting it over the border??  You guessed it…   Germany.

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The Germans were a bit upset that the engine valve covers are stamped “Made in Australia”.

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Inside, there were 2 large rooms,  with models, tools, books, kindred spirits who were delighted to have a chat.

Inside, there were 2 large rooms, with models, tools, books, kindred spirits who were delighted to have a chat.  I recognise the beam engine and quorn T&C grinder in the foreground.

Eccentric Engineering had a display of his Diamond Tool holder, but I have already bought 6-7 of these in different sizes.  I did top up my stock of Crobalt cutters.

Eccentric Engineering had a display of his Diamond Tool holder, but I have already bought 6-7 of these in different sizes. I did top up my stock of Crobalt cutters.

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Eccentric Engineering was showing his Acute Tool Sharpening System. I was very tempted to buy his kit of parts, but was fearful of my reception from SWMBO, if I returned with yet another tool and cutter grinder.

A very impressive Atkinson engine.   it was running earlier.  Les are you there?

A very impressive Atkinson engine. it was running earlier. Les are you there?

The Eccentric T&C cutter grinder kit.

Of the many outstanding models, this one was superb.  Not totally finished.  But totally appropriate for Bendigo. Of the many superb models on display, this one was outstanding. And totally appropriate for Bendigo, given its mining heritage.

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Pictured with the maker. The twin double acting steam engines were running on compressed air for the exhibition. Will look great running on steam!

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Some future model engineers, viewing a very nice, running, triple expansion steam engine.

Some future model engineers, viewing a very nice, running, triple expansion steam engine.

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A beautifully finished Bolton 12 beam engine

A beautifully finished Bolton 12 beam engine.  Makes mine look a bit drab.

10 cylinder radial aero engine, made from stainless steel.

10 cylinder radial aero engine, made from stainless steel by Bob Bryant.  Hmm, maybe a 9 cylinder.

 

I particularly likes this working Meccano model of an excavator.  The digging action was particularly realistic.

I particularly likes this working Meccano model of an excavator. The digging action was particularly realistic.

Another beam engine, this one made using Meccano.  Takes me back 55 years!

Another beam engine, this one made using Meccano. Takes me back 55 years!

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A particularly beautifully finished oscillating engine, totally made from bar stock.

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DIVERSION

I have heard that the castings for the triple expansion marine engine will be arriving in the next week or so. That is good news after waiting since the order was placed in January.
In the meantime, I have bought some castings and partly made components for a Burrell Traction Engine. It is 1.5″ scale, and I obtained some 1.5″ plans from EJ Winter for the Burrell. Unfortunately, one mans’ 1.5″ is anothers’ 1.45″ and the plans are not exactly correct for the castings! What would have been a difficult build, has turned into a very difficult build. So I have put it aside and will tackle it gradually. The plans will be some use, but as well as the difference in scale, there are differences in the designs. So I will have to make it up as I go, to a considerable extent.
My metal working club has promoted a competition for 2014, and it appeared to be a fairly simple build, so that is what I am currently machining. See the progress in the photos below. It is a Stirling heat engine, designed by J Ridders. You can see one working on the Ridders web site http://heetgasmodelbouw.ridders.nu

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Almost finished stand for the cylinder fork.

Almost finished stand for the cylinder fork.

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Components made so far

Components made so far

The spirit burner, almost finished.  Copper and brass,  silver soldered.

The spirit burner, almost finished. Copper and brass, silver soldered.

Stirling "Bobber" plans

Stirling “Bobber” plans

BEAM ENGINE, FIRST RUN