johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Tag: Rifled muzzle loader

Armstrong RML barrel

After 3D printing a plastic 1:10 barrel I decided to have a go at turning one in steel.  I had a length of steel 70mm diameter and 290mm long, which was just too short to turn the entire barrel, so I decided to make one of the breech reduction rings separately, when I make the cascabel.

I did not know what the steel grade was, but it was off a machine so I thought that there would be a good chance that it would be reasonable quality.

P1053584

The length of rod next to the printed barrel.

The turning was initially fairly routine.

P1053594

and I was really pleased with the finish which was appearing.

P1053597

Mountains of hot swarf.

P1053600

The roughed out barrel.  I used the 16mm drill bit to drill the bore from both ends, but there was still 50mm or so beyond the reach of the bit.  So I silver soldered the drill bit into a length of silver steel (drill rod).

P1053604

And quickly completed the drilled hole. 

P1053606

Then transferred the piece to the CNC lathe, and shaped the barrel exterior.

I experienced 2 problems with the CNC turning.  The tapered chase of the barrel, and the rounded fillets came out really well, but the straight sections of the breech developed chatter marks.  I was preparing to take a skim to remove the chatter marks when I bumped the manual CNC control, the cutter dug in, and I got a deep score in the breech.  And broke the carbide cutter.  I turned away the dig in, but it left the breech diameter 3.5mm undersize.

I have no more steel of that size, and it will be quite a while before I get an opportunity to buy some.  So I persisted with the slightly undersized barrel.  It will be 62mm diameter rather than the intended 65.5mm.   I still have not decided whether to scrap it and start again.  But if I can get some more suitable steel I will remake it.  I might even use the undersized barrel to make a 64lb Armstrong RML, which had a smaller diameter breech than the 80lb RML which I am making.

P1053610

I showed it to SWMBO.  “That is beautiful” she said, somewhat to my surprise, and being surprised by its 3.5kg weight. 

P1053614

Ah…  if only…

3D Printing is FUN! (but still slow)

IMG_8498

My 3D printer.  Bought from Amazon on a special offer.  $AUD279.  Worked straight out of the box after minimal assembly, and using the supplied plastic filament (PLA).  You can see the large gear on the platten which I drew up using a CAD program.  I used the software (Cura) supplied by the printer manufacturer (Creality).   The printer is a Creality CR -10S.  The “S” refers to a “filament out” sensor which I have not yet installed.  I read some reviews of the printer before spending my money, and so far I am very happy with it.  You might notice some bracing bars which I bought separately on Ebay.  Not sure if they are necessary, but they might improve the print quality by reducing vibration in the printer.

P1053563

These gears and shafts were printed.  They were used to check the sizes of parts for my next model cannon build.  I used a program called “Gearotic” to plan the gear module, teeth numbers, distance between centres etc.  Gearotic is also great fun.

P1053561

The printed gear and pinion quadrant on a background of a photo of the real cannon.  On my model the gear and pinion will be made of steel or brass, machined from bar stock.

P1053558

Another part sitting on a photo of the original.  This demonstrated that I had got the corner chamfer a bit wrong.  Much better to discover the fault at this stage! 

P1053560

A half size print of the barrel.  This was just for fun.  The final part will be ~300mm long, and will be machined from steel.  This print took almost 4 hours.

P1053557

A print of the centre column which the cannon chassis sits on and traverses around.  It is ~60mm tall.  It will be tricky to machine from solid bar.  Could be fabricated in pieces and silver soldered together, but I am considering using the printed part to make a mould and cast the part in brass or bronze……   The original cannon column has an 5-600mm extension into the concrete base which my model will not need.

So far all of these prints have been made from PLA filament, which I read is easy to use, tough, rather brittle, and has a low melting point.  It is also inexpensive (about $20-25 for 1 kg).  I am still on the supplied small roll which came with the printer.  Future prints will be in colour!

The weather is a bit cooler today, so I might get back into the workshop and make some metal swarf.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: