johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Category: Machinery

CNC Lathe Toolpost Mill

Just a quickie to show you a progress photo of my current project.

It is a very small milling motor with a small ER collet, mounted onto the toolpost of my Boxford CNC lathe, which will convert the lathe from 2 to 3 axes.

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At this early stage the toolpost holder and cylindrical motor have been mounted to the water jet cut bracket on the right side.  Pulleys and drive belt yet to be fitted and I will trim the shaft at the left hand end of the motor.  Then the motor wires are connected to a speed and direction and on-off controller.

The usefulness of this tool is apparent in the following video of a completed unit in use.  The main spindle motor of the lathe is now a 750w AC servo motor, which can be controlled from Mach 3, to go to programmed positions and hold the position while a milling procedure takes place.  Of course the milling procedure will be with small cutters or drills, perhaps up to 3-4mm diameter.

The idea, plans, and some of the parts are courtesy of Stuart Tankard, my very clever friend, whose completed machine is the subject of the following video.

Stuart’s video is republished here with permission.  The original, with comments, is visible on YouTube.  If you have technical questions about the setup, I suggest that you contact Stuart via his YouTube post.

A European Workshop

Most of the workshop pictures so far have come from Australia, and one from UK.  This one is from Holland, sorry Huib, the Netherlands.

Interesting differences.  Huib built his own workshop, and he has some nice gear.  All of these photos came upside-down.  Funny how they consider Oz to be “down-under”.  Obviously their reference points are wrong. THEY are the upside-down ones.  I mean, we are walking upright, right?  They must be upside-down!

 

Hello John,

Here finally my contribution to your workshop series, as always I might want to show and share too much with others, that’s why I want you to show  what you can support and is in line with the possibilities you have on your blog. 

See if you can make one blog part of it or cut it into pieces. That’s up to you. I transfer the pictures with WE TRANSFER to you, as it is right you got a mail with the link to download the pictures.

It looks like the pictures that it is all clean and tidy maybe but appearances are deceptive, most of the time it’s not so tidy for me either, for the pictures I cleaned it up.

I have tried to be as complete as possible but if there are any questions please let me know.

I built the barn myself, so as the floor plan was drawn. First I built room 1 which is completely isolated and where I can work during the winter, there are also the most expensive machines. 

Later on I built room 2, to store also the wood for the stove. Finally, 5 years ago I built room 3, the largest room where also other things are stored as only hobby stuff, also our bikes and everthing els.

Room 1 is the room where I stay most in, coarse work I do room 2, such as sawing, sanding and coarse drilling.  In room 3 I mainly do business that need some space, the large, homemade workbench is a good tool for that. And as you can see, I can’t throw anything away and I keep everything I think of that can be useful in the next hundred years.

The photos contain references to the machine and the space where they are located.

I hope you like the total information.

Kindest regards

Huib

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The barn self build longsite room 3.jpg

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The thing about Holland, is that they HAVE to make the world’s best pumps.  Otherwise they are under water.  Much of the country is below sea level.

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Now, that is nice!

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Ahhh!

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Ahhhhhh!

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Nice!  But I will stick with CNC.

Huib also sent a video of his steam plant.  Unfortunately I do not have the space to post it, but if Huib can remember the YouTube address I will include that later.

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Storage is always a problem no?

So, thank you Huib, for sharing your workplace with us.  It is very interesting to see how other model engineers work, and their equipment.  I have posted only a fraction of Huib’s photos, due to space limitations.    I hope that the chosen shots are of interest to my readers.

ps.  Huib, I found the YouTube video…Very nice work!

 

Another John’s Workshop.

Now this is a workshop where I would feel at home…..

“Hi John some photo’s attached.

I work in my double garage 56 square meters. I have been self employed for the last 30 years but have reached the stage where I want to retire, some of my customers still send me jobs to do which I cannot say no to so it keeps the hobby going.
I have a Bridgeport copy converted to 4 axis CNC running Mach3 using MachStdMill screen set (love it).
My lathe is a Prototrak SLX on a King Rich lathe bed ( toolroom quality).
Misc other machines small surface grinder,tool & cutter grinder, compressor, 15 tonne press, bandsaw,welding gear electric & oxy acetylene, overhead crane ( 250kg capacity )
I am running out of space.
I am close to finishing my boiler will send some photo’s soon.
Cheers
John”
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Thanks for the pics John.  A bit of gear envy happening here.  Love the gantry!

TWO WORKSHOPS

This post was inspired by one of my readers sending me some photos of her workshop.  The photos grabbed my attention for several reasons.

Firstly, the metal working machines share the space with tomatoes!  Unusual, eclectic use of the space.  Secondly, the roof and walls are made of glass!   Great for natural lighting, and nice views for the machinist, and possibly the neighbours.  Thirdly, it is such a small space, requiring planning to accomodate quite a few machines and work space.   And fourthly, it is so neat and clean.  I do see an occasional bit of swarf, but it is so unlike the mess that I work in, that it is quite striking to see such a clean workshop.

Thanks to reader Jennifer for sending these photos.  For obvious reasons I will not publish further location details except to reveal that the location is in the UK.

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Jennifer tells me that it is all double glazed, and is open to the living area of the house, so it is heated.  Apparently it never becomes too hot in summer.

And as a complete antithesis, this is my main workshop in Oz.  Bigger, messier, dirtier, darker.    Actually, when I looked over my photos I could not find one decent view of my workshop, so I took some new pics.  Needless to say, there was no special tidying for the photo.

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It is a tin shed, unlined, but does have a wood heater.  This view takes in about 2/3 of the area.  There are 3 lathes in this shot.  Can you see them?  CNC lathe in foreground.  Also my CNC mill on the right.  There is also a tool and cutter grinder, vertical bandsaw, drop bandsaw.  And lots of ancillary tooling.

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And a pedestal drill, 2 linishers, grinder, and part view of the drop band saw.  The anvil gets quite a lot of use.  It is mounted on heavy duty wheels so I can take it to the job.

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My workbench in the foreground, A very heavy cast iron setup table (blue) with granite surface plate.  Shop made ring roller centre.

So, that is where I spend most of my waking hours.  The shed started life as a farm workshop, where a lot of welding, and repair and maintenance of farm machinery was done.   These days it is mainly used for model engineering.  In my working life I was an obsessively neat, organised and particular surgeon.  Not quite sure how my activities ended in this mess.  But you know what?… I feel totally comfortable here.

 

 

If you have some photos of your own workshop area, please send them in and I will publish them for the interest of other readers.  Big areas, small areas, old machines or new.  Show us where you spend your most enjoyable hours.   Send them to me at jviggers@iinet.net.au

 

 

 

 

Installing the lathe gear

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I neglected to take a photo of the completed gear.  In this shot it is almost finished.

I intended to reassemble the spindle and its cluster of gears, spacers, and taper roller bearings myself, but after talking to an expert on the topic (Swen Pettig), I realised that sometimes it is better to leave surgery to a surgeon.

I gratefully accepted Swen’s offer to help.  In his working  life Swen had performed this task on many, many occasions.

Firstly Swen reinserted the taper bearing outer races in the headstock.  The lathe spindle is approx 80mm diameter and 800mm long so it is heavy.  After carefully cleaning, it was fed into the headstock, progressively loading the bearings, gears, spacers, clips and nuts, and moving and tapping them down the shaft as it was moved into place.

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Note the photo prints to remind us of the order of reassembly.  Board to protect the lathe bed.  Repaired gear laying flat.  Surgeons’ towels blue rags.

when it was all reassembled and tightened, the retaining disk at the chuck end was loosened, sealed with liquid gasket (Loctite product- cannot remember the name), and retightened.

Then Swen went through a lengthy process of checking the end play, using a dial indicator, tapping each end of the shaft with a copper hammer, and finally settling on 0.01mm of play.

Then we had a short test run at low speed, and he tested the end play again, with no change.

Then we set it running at 200 rpm, and went and had a cup of coffee for 20 minutes.  Came back and checked the bearings temperatures.   All cold, all good.

I reinstalled the external gears, the cover, etc, and took some decent cuts in some cold rolled bar.

All good.  Oil change soon.

 

London Museum of Science Revisited

I am back in oz as of a few hours ago.  Freezing and wet.  Was 26c in London today.

On my last afternoon in London I had a few hours spare.  So I caught the tube to have a final farewell to the Trevithick dredger engine and to reshoot some photos which I had messed up at my visit 3 weeks earlier.

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Trevithick dredger engine in the LSM.

…and I spent a very pleasant hour photographing the engines in the Energy Hall again.

And on wandering further into the building I discovered that on the previous visit I had totally missed about 2/3 of the entire museum, including the model of the Trevithick road vehicle which had been made as a concept model by Trevithick’s brother in law, a clock maker.

Unfortunately it was bottom lit and behind glass, so very difficult to get good photos.

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From above

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From the side.

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The model is more akin to his road vehicle “Puffing Devil” than the rail locomotive.

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Quite modern looking lathe by Richard Roberts 1807.  With lead screw and outboard gears for threading.

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Beam engine designed by James Watt 1797.

 

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Model of a steam powered workshop, with many tiny exquisitely modelled lathes, shapers, presses, saws, and a steam engine.  Those lathes are about 3″ long.

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And a 1:12 model of a pressure gauge of James Watt, 1794.  60 years before the invention of the Bourdon tube.

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And this one amused me.  It is a 1987 Colchester CNC lathe, with Fanuc controller.  It is 2 years newer than my Boxford CNC lathe.

This really was the finale of my adventures in the UK.

 

Broken Lathe Gear – Update.

I searched the lists of stock spur gears from international suppliers but I could not find a supplier of a 77 tooth, module 3 gear.  77 teeth is apparently unusual.  Plenty of suppliers for 76 and 78 tooth gears, but none for 77.

I did find an Ebay seller who had some old new stock of rotary HSS gear cutters and I  considered making a new gear.

But meanwhile, after airing the situation at a GSMEE meeting, I had a recommendation to try a local gear maker.   Well, fairly local.   He is 1 hour up the freeway.   But the phone calls were unanswered, repeatedly.  Another fellow GSMEE member also required a gear cut, for a telescope mount (a BIG telescope…. another story), and it was on his route home, so he called in, prepared to bang on the gear maker’s door.    Despite the industrial turn down in Australian manufacturing, the gear maker is so flat out with work, that he has stopped answering the phone.  But he received Frank very cordially, and was also very friendly and helpful to me when I turned up 2 hours later.

I took the broken gear and its shaft, and he is preparing a quote.  His initial recommendation is that the gear be replaced entirely, rather than repaired, or a toothed ring shrunk on.  So I am waiting for the quote.  But frankly, the lathe is unusable the way it is, so I cannot imagine rejecting the quote, unless it is so high that I am pushed back to making a gear myself.  I will post this when I get the quote.   Meanwhile, a photo, and a plug for the gear making business.

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This is Johnny, the owner manager of Sunshine Gears

Johnny proudly showed me around his factory, and we discussed the options for my job in detail.  He has many (~40) gear hobbing machines, lathes, mills, and jobs in progress.  He is just about to get his first CNC machine, a lathe.  The  machine in the photo was making a gear cluster of 6 or 7 different sized gears.

Sunshine Gears is at 14 First Avenue, Sunshine, Victoria.  Telephone 0393117152.   Probably best to just call in rather than telephone.

Post script.   After considering the quotes I have asked Johnny to make me a gear which I will attach to the original hub.  It should be ready for me to pick up when I return from my UK trip.   It saves several hundred dollars to do it this way, rather than getting the entire gear with hub made from scratch.

By the time this post is published I should be in the air…..

 

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