johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Category: riveting

Recovering from Friction Welding

Back to the model Armstrong cannon carriage this afternoon, and fitting 2 internal transoms, which provide rigidity to the carriage.

The transoms had been laser cut some months ago.  I cut the floor from 2.8mm stainless steel.

Each transom is attached to the sides and floor by angle iron, 2mm thick.  In the original cannons the angle iron was mitred at the corners, and for this model “A” carriage I decided to try to replicate the mitres.

The angle iron was again bandsawn from RSS tube and milled to 10x10mm.  I used the following setup to form the 45º angles…

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This is the Eccentric Engineering tool sharpening arm, set up to 45º on my RadiusMaster belt sander, about to form mitre angles on the angle iron resting to the right.

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The Angle iron pieces were glued to their respective transoms, and 2mm holes drilled.  Bolts progressively inserted.  The lengths and cutouts will be trimmed later.

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Then milled and filed the corners until the parts fitted neatly into the carriage.  Rivets will be inserted later.

 

…and for your interest/amusement, depending on your UFO opinion…  Listen to the information, and try to ignore the appearance of the narrator.

 

….and do I think that UFO’s are real?    I would say that my “belief” has risen from 95% to 99% YES.   One of my readers, with whom I have spoken directly, and for whom I have no doubts about personal veracity, has seen one at close quarters.  Do I think that they are of non human origin?  A bit less positive about that one, but it does seem more likely than not.  Waiting to see if and what NYT does publish.

 

Model Armstrong Cannon. Assembling the bits. And a riveting improvement.

After 4 -6 weeks of making castings, and remaking them, and remaking  them again, I have finally started drilling holes and bolting pieces together, in preparation for final riveting.

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I ground a 2mm diameter end on my centre punch so I could transfer the cast holes on the brackets to the sides of the carriage for drilling.  (using a toolpost grinder on my lathe to grind the center punch.)

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Center popping

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I could not resist pushing some parts together to visualise how the carriage will appear.  10 wheels per carriage to be made.   This is the “B” carriage, on which I try out the techniques.

More riveting.

Using my new riveting gun, I inserted a lot more rivets on the “A” chassis…and I used a technique suggested by one of my readers…bearing in mind that my first riveting efforts marred the surface of the parent metal, and were generally rather irregular rather than neat.

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Virtually NO surface dents, very regular, a big improvement.   I had intended to polish out the machining swirls, but SWMBO said that they were appealing and interesting.

And the technique was this….

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The rivets are inserted 5-10 at a time, then the heads are covered with tape.  Duct tape in this case.  The work is then turned over, and the rivets do not fall out.

Each rivet head is centered over the anvil, and the pneumatic gun is used with the snap on the other end.   The tape stops the rivets from falling out, and also protects the parent metal from the snaps.  I experienced virtually no parent metal bruising.  And was VERY fast.  A major improvement.  Many thanks Timothy G!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Riveting the Armstrong Cannon Chassis Model

I am waiting for delivery of the 5 l vacuum chamber so I can commence casting parts for my 1:10 Armstrong cannon.  So today, I spent some workshop time riveting the chassis of the 1:10 Armstrong 80lb muzzle loading rifled cannon model.

I am a total novice as far as solid riveting goes.  The following photos will prove that fact.

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I am holding a new Taiwanese riveting gun.  The girder into which I have just inserted almost 100 copper 2mm rivets is resting on the vice.  The anvil is clamped into the vice.  The snap (home made) is in the gun.

I have marked the surface of the girder with the anvil and snap.  Doesn’t look good, but I am hoping that it will be acceptable after painting.

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I painted the inside of one girder with layout paint just to see if the crappy riveting will be acceptable.  Still considering that question.

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A staged photo of rivet insertion.

And just to lighten this post, yesterday I had a visit from my grandchildren, 2/3 daughters, sons in law, and SWMBO at my workshop.

So I fired up the Fowler 3″ traction engine and gave the kids a demo of filling the boiler with water, lighting the furnace, a discussion about the nature of coal, and a ride.

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Despite the wintery weather, it was a very happy afternoon.   Audrey 4, Edward 4, Charlie 4, and John 7.   And John 70.  We have had an unusually wet autumn, hence the green grass.  No tigers seen.

 

Riveting for Real

The strength and resistance to twisting and other movements of the Armstrong cannon is in the chassis.  Specifically the design and strength of the longitudinal girders, AND the box section structure at the front of the chassis.

The box section has been a challenge in the 1:10 model.  Actually, it has been a bit of a nightmare.

It has taken me 3 full day sessions to work out how to construct this assembly, to make the parts, to join them together, then a lot of filing to make the assembly fit the girders.

And, of course, the parts are riveted together, and I am a total novice at riveting.

So this is the result.  Not totally finished and assembled, but getting there.

Again, I left my camera at the workshop.  These are photos which I took with my phone.

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The box section is an assembly of parts.  The ends were silver soldered.  The panels which show are steel, and will all eventually be riveted to the end sections.  At this time, some joins are still just bolted and nutted.

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This is the front of the chassis.  The rivets look OK yes?

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And the inside rivets were the first ones to be inserted.  Mostly worked OK.  They are copper, will eventually be painted the same colour as the girders.

And after the riveting, I have spent almost a full day of gentle and progressive filing to make the box section fit the girders.  It all fitted beforehand.  But after riveting, nothing fitted.  All of that hammering clearly changed some of the dimensions.  But, despite all of my pessimism, it all eventually fitted.

Now, I have another chassis to make.

Do I repeat the method, or maybe try something more efficient.  Like making a solid block of brass or steel, shape the exterior to dimensions, then hollow the interior?  Still pondering that one.

Part of the equation is that the riveting gun died.  Not sure what happened.  Maybe a blown O-ring?   The final few rivets in the above pictures were hammered.  My hammering is definitely not as neat as the rivet gun.   I do have a rivet gun on order, but they are estimating an arrival date of the END OF JUNE!   I cannot wait until then.  And the faulty gun is not mine so I feel diffident about pulling it apart and maybe repairing it, maybe really screwing it up.

The last time that I cursed the virus I lost 25% of my readers, so I will just think it.