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machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Tag: Southworth

So Many Mistakes! Am I Too Old for this hobby? Or is it the heat?

Having completed the model Trevithick dredger engine, and not having an inspiration to start another major build, I decided to make another steam driven boiler feed pump.

Earlier this year (2019) I made a horizontal, duplex, twin cylinder feed pump for the 6″ vertical boiler, but I had also purchased the castings and plans for a vertical, single cylinder feed pump, not having decided which version to fit to the boiler.  The horizontal twin version fits and functions very well, but I decided to make the vertical version while I am thinking about another major build.

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This is what it will look like.  Hopefully.  Single acting 3/4″ steam cylinder top, and 1/2″ water pump bottom.

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The plans, O rings and castings.  The castings have been cleaned up on the RadiusMaster, and the steam cylinder (top) is almost finished.

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The 7 pages of plans are excellent.  Imperial measurements and fasteners.  I will use metric fasteners.

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But I work in metric.

So over the past few days, excluding the ones over 38ºc (100ºf), I have been machining the gun metal castings.  And making a real mess of it.

The Mess.

  1. The steam cylinder bore.  Bored with a boring head on the milling machine.  Turned out nicely, but I decided to run a 3/4″ reamer while it was set up on the mill, thinking that the dimension would be more accurate.  I did not notice until too late that the reamer was damaged.  It badly scored the bore.  I considered making a new cylinder from bar stock, but used the boring head to remove the scores.  Now 0.75mm oversize.  Annoying but not fatal.
  2. Steam passage not centered.
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    The steam passage in the cylinder cutout is meant to be centered.  It is off at a 15º angle, and is centered with the cylinder top, but not the bottom of the cutout where it should be.   OK, it will not be seen, will not affect the function.  Just a trivial mistake.  That is the final oversize bore.

    3.  This one could have been fatal.  All of the center drill holes for the screws and steam passages in the cylinder valve face were off by about 1mm.  The workpiece had moved in the milling vice between setup and machining.  I really thought that this would probably require a new part, but I decided to proceed and see what eventuated.

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    The middle 6 holes are the steam inlet and exhaust passages.  Fortunately they are in the correct vertical position, and have just been widened horizontally by the incorrect centre drill holes, which should not effect the function.  The screw holes merged into the incorrect holes, and were pulled a fraction laterally, but should be OK.   At final assembly I will fill the incorrect holes with something, probably epoxy or gasket goo.

    4. This was the most obvious error.  Moved the mill table in the wrong direction, and the rectangular hole ended up with an extension.  I don’t think that it will effect the function.  And it wont be seen by anyone except me, and all of you blog readers.  Oh, and now I have to kill you.

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    Bugger bugger bugger

    5.  This was another mill problem.  I had changed the tools to a 1.6mm drill bit, and reset the Z axis zero.  Or had I?  Maybe I had neglected to hit <enter> after the reset.  Anyway, the chuck crashed at high speed into the job, impaling and snapping off the drill bit, gouging the steam chest, and the drill chuck gouged the milling vice.  The chuck survived but required some remodelling on the belt sander and then a diamond file.   The vice jaw also needed some impact craters to be flattened, then swapped out to another less critical vice.

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    I flattened the gouges in the steam chest face, and I will make sure to fill those with something at final assembly.  The embedded drill bit can stay there, after flattening it with emery paper.

 

There were some other more minor issues, which do not bear repeating and prolonging this missive.  This all happened over 2 days.  Mistakes are made, and I console myself with my father’s advice “he who makes no mistakes makes nothing”.  But, this is the worst run of blues which I can remember.   It IS hot, which is not ideal machining conditions.  So what do I do?

Well, maybe it is just a bad patch, and things will be better next session.  And, I will try to be not SO impatient to get things finished that I don’t double check.  I (and you) will just have to wait and see.

BTW, have a safe and happy new year. 2020.  It is 101 years since we had a double number year (1919), and most of us will not see the next one (2121).  So make the most of it!

 

 

 

Boiler Feed Pump Pumping

Yesterday I reseated the pump valves, reassembled the pump, then tested it on steam.

Most of the following video has the boiler at only 25psi, but I did run it off camera at up to 75psi.

After making the video I redirected the exhaust steam from the pump into the firebox.  It actually seemed to improve the gas flame, maybe by acting as a blower.  Not so sure about this being permanent though, because the exhaust steam contains oil from the displacement oiler, and I dont want that oil to be deposited in the firetubes.

I will make a water tank to supply boiler water.  Maybe the exhaust steam could be passed through a heat exchanger in the tank, so the boiler feed water is preheated.

(if the video is not showing, click on the https link below)

 

First Steam for Boiler Feed Pump

 

 

 

Boiler Feed Pump -Working

I could not induce my Southworth steam powered boiler feed pump to work.

Initially I thought that it was a bit tight, and spent time easing the glands, and slightly deepening the O ring grooves.  That took a couple of days.  But no luck.

So today I took it to our model engineering meeting, with some tools to perform a tear down, and 2 of our senior members took a close look.  After some to-ing and fro-ing, the verdict was that I had reversed one of the steam passage blocks, and machined it back to front.  I had mis-interpreted the plans.  It was due to not really knowing the rules for rotating a part in 3rd angle plans.  Pretty annoying.  A 3d view of the part would have removed any confusion.  Fortunately the fix was not too complicated.  2 threaded holes to fill, and 2 new holes to drill and thread on the other side.

That done, I re-assembled the steam engine side of the duplex.  Hooked up a compressed air hose, and see the result….

This is on approx 10psi air.  There is no load, so it is running faster than it would if actually pumping water under pressure.

Next I will mount it to the boiler base, and hook up the pipes.  Then there will probably be another video.

Southworth Steam Boiler Feed Pump Progress.

With book reviews and OP’s workshops on this blog you might be wondering if anything is happening in MY workshop.

Well, yes.

I have been beavering away, making parts for the Southworth steam powered boiler water feed pump.  Today I made the final parts.  The machining has been fairly basic and straightforward, so no special photos or videos.

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These are the parts and assemblies.  Top is the steam cylinders left, the water cylinders right.  The water pump stack not attached.  The the tails for the valve rods, the valve rods with valves attached, the cylinder caps, the valve rod levers, and some of the gaskets.

I will make a separate blog about the gaskets.  These were all laser cut.  I will never hand cut another gasket.  Laser cutting is cheap, fast and accurate.  Way to go!

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The valve levers and fittings.   These are small, precise, and accurate.  Quite a pain to make, even with CNC.  I remade more than one of these, due to dropping and losing the original.  The fasteners are M2, and not finalised.  The off centre drilling of the left hand fitting is of no consequence (I hope).

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The valve rods, M2.5, and valves.  Cutting those threads, 2.5mm diameter and 25mm long, was also a challenge.  I learnt about fixed steadies, but too late to use on this job.  Subject for a future blog.

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And some of the cylinder end caps.  There are 8 altogether.

So now that all of the parts/components are made, I will commence the assembly, then the timing of the steam engine component.  Watch this space.

Book review of “A Military History of China” coming up soon.  Quite an eye opener.

If you have not sent in photos of your workspace, please do so.  The series has generated quite a lot of interest.

 

Southworth Steam/Water Pump

I am progressing my Southworth pump.   Today, Stuart brought his completed version, so I photographed the incomplete and complete versions together.   Actually, it was very useful to see Stuart’s pump again.  An obvious difference in one of the components made me realise that I had made a mistake.   Now rectified.

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My incomplete version and the working version.

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Stuart’s working version.

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