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machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Tag: trunnions

Trunnion Mounts -2

It took a whole day making and fitting  the top caps of the trunnion mounts from brass.

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A 76 x 76mm piece of brass was milled to 10mm thickness.  The trunnion straps will finish at 9.5mm , giving me a 0.5mm machining allowance.

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The 4 straps were cut out using a new 4mm endmill.  Rounded internal corners were milled square, and the bottom tabs were milled to 2mm thickness.

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2mm wide slots were milled into the brackets, and ends of the slots were filed square.  None of my rifling files were small enough, so I ground one to size, leaving the faces and one edge  intact.

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Trunnion mount almost finished.  Pins in the tags to come, and they will pull the strap down tight with a cam action.  The half circle line on the bottom bearing is a painting border to delineate the bottom bracket from the bronze bearing surface which will not be painted.  If you inspect the full size trunnion in the previous post you will see what I mean.

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Now I can take some measurements of the model, and start the barrel elevating gear.  There are 4 gears to be cut, including  bevel gears, handle, shafts, gear case, and some complex mounts.

Trunnion Mounts -1

On the Armstrong 80 lb RML model cannon, the trunnions are secured to the carriage with  steel brackets riveted to the carriage sides, and the trunnions rotate in a bronze bearing.

3404 trunnion L

The original trunnion on the Port Fairy cannon

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These are the component parts.

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The RSS ready for cutting out the brackets.  And my working drawing, with alterations.

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First the 2mm rivet holes were drilled, then the outlines were CNC milled.  The steel is 2mm thick.

P1074246Tidied the parts with a file and belt sander.

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The brackets sitting on a photo of the original Warrnambool cannon.

The bronze bearing involved some basic lathe work.

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Then the components were silver soldered together.  Delicate work.  I did not want the solder running into some areas, and the join needed to retain a degree of precision.

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After cooling, sulphuric acid soak, and washing, the top half of the bearing was milled off.

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Some filing to make it fit the carriage, then rivet holes drilled with a Dremel while the bracket was clamped in position.

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Bolted in position temporarily.  Tomorrow I will make the top half of the bracket.  The gap between the bracket and the carriage caused by the metal folding will eventually be filled, and invisible.  A millimeter or so will be removed from the width of the bracket and bearing.

I had a bit of milling excitement while cutting out the steel components.   I was using a 6.35mm 4 flute carbide cutter, and when I started the program the machine plunged into the shape at extremely high speed.  When I checked, the feed speed was 60 times higher than I had specified.  Somehow, the units had changed from mm/minute, to mm/SECOND.  Amazingly, the cut was close to perfect with no damage to the workpiece.  But, alas, it wrecked the carbide cutter.

I had recently upgraded the CNC software (Vectric V-Carve Pro) from version 10 to 10.5.  Maybe some of my settings in the program had been changed in the upgrade?  I never use mm/second.  That is a woodworking CNC router unit.

How were Trunnions Joined to 1866 Barrels? Correction of a previous post.

The earliest cast cannon barrels were cast in one piece, and the trunnions were included in the casting.

By 1866 however, large barrels were made from 4 or more separate pieces, which were heat shrunk together, and additionally forge welded together.

The following information comes from “Naval Gunnery” by Captain H. Garbett, published in 1897.

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The diagram is of a 64lb Armstrong rifled muzzle loader.  The 80 lb muzzle loader, which I am modelling, was very similar to, and based on the 64lb gun, except that the diameters of the sections were larger, giving greater wall thickness.

The “A” tube, containing the bore,  was made from best quality forged steel, in one piece, although earlier models used the “coil” method described below, and earlier than that it was wrought iron.  It was permanently closed at the breech, but in slightly later models it was open, sealed with a copper disk which was held against the cascabel.  The A tube was bored and rifled after assembly of all of the barrel pieces.

The “B” tube, or tapered chase was heat shrunk onto the “A” tube.  It was a coil construction. (see below).

The “Breech Coil” had 3 components, plus a cascable which screwed into place with a deep, asymmetric thread.  One of the components was the “trunnion ring”, which was welded to, and separated the other 2 components.

“COIL” TUBES.

When steel is forged into a strip, apparently it is strongest along its length due to the orientation of the crystalline structure.   It was discovered that the strongest cannon barrels were made from long strips of forged iron or steel (up to 200 feet long), which were then wound around a mandrel, while red hot, forming a cylinder.  The red hot coil was then hammer welded into a solid cylindrical mass, with most of the steel crystals aligned circumferentially.  It was then machined into its final shape, with allowance for final heat shrinkage onto its mates.

 

The “TRUNNION RING”.

The trunnion ring was forged from a single billet of steel.  Two holes were punched through the red hot billet, expanding the sides.  Further hammering shaped the trunnions from the lateral expansions.  The final shape was then machined.

The three breech pieces were forge welded together, and heat shrunk onto the “A” tube and the “B” tube.  I could not discover the construction sequence of welding/shrinking these components.

This post is to correct an earlier post about the trunnions in the Armstrong cannon  construction, in which I stated that the trunnions were heat shrunk into the barrel.  The incorrect implication was that the trunnions were heat shrunk into holes in the barrel sides.  My recent reading indicated that the “trunnion holes” method, which I used in my model, was NOT the method used in 1866.  I am not losing sleep over this lack of authenticity in construction of my model.  One of many compromises which are made when scale modelling.

 

 

Armstrong RML Cannon Trunnions – 2

Silver soldering the trunnions into the barrel and the squared blocks did not go well.

For a start, I did not know the composition of the steel of the barrel.  The trunnions were/are silver steel, and the blocks were mild steel.  So it is possible that I did not use the best flux.

And the barrel is quite hefty, so I knew that it would require a lot of heat to get it to temperature, and to keep it at soldering temperature.  So I used a large oxy-propane torch, and heated it to dull red heat.

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The steel pieces fluxed and wired together, ready for heating

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It was a cool day, but the heat output from the red hot barrel was ferocious.

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Soldered, but one side was not good, and a hammer blow dislodged it.  Damn.

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The good side, partially machined.

I dithered about how to deal with the faulty side.  I was not enthusiastic about re-soldering it, expecting that the good side would fall apart.

So I cleaned up the pieces, and used high strength, high temperature, Loctite 620, to join the pieces.  The machining will test the strength of the joins, so I will give it the full 24 hours before testing it.  This is the “reject” barrel.

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Still pondering how to join the trunnions of the “good” barrel (front).  I will discuss it with my colleagues tomorrow when we have a Model Engineering Society meeting on “Zoom” video link.  The 3D printed barrel at back is a handy “how it should look” example.

 

 

 

Armstrong RML Cannon Trunnions 1.

cannon from above front

The 80lb Armstrong RML cannon trunnions were probably heat shrunk into the sides of the barrel.  (WRONG!  See post from July 2020.  The construction of these barrels was much more complex than I had imagined.  The trunnions were part of a forged ring which was heat shrunk then welded to the other components of the barrel).  The squared off barrel sides would have been part of the original wound and welded steel rods, and machined to shape before the trunnions were inserted.

The hole above the trunnion is to hold one of the 4 sights.

For the 1:10 model I considered various construction methods. This is what I decided…

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The 20mm diameter trunnion is fitted into a milled steel block, and the 2 pieces on each side are then silver soldered into prepared recesses in the barrel.

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The the barrel is mounted in the CNC rotary table and tailstock.  15mm deep holes are drilled into the barrel….

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and widened to 20mm diameter (drilled then milled)……  (for cutting fluid I use a mixture of olive oil and kerosene.  It produces a lot of evaporated fluid but is very effective at keeping the job cool).

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….then complete the recess.   The bottom of the recess is 8mm clear of the bore.

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Next step is to make the blocks, the trunnions, and silver solder them all together.  Not entirely authentic, but compromises are required when scaling down.   Still on the reject barrel, as a trial run.