johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Tag: Ottoman cannon

Trevithick Engine by Lumix, and an Ottoman cannon.

Some more photos with the Panasonic Lumix LX100M2.

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The Trevithick dredger engine, still lacking lagging and paint.  The chimney has a chimney extension connector, sitting a bit crooked.

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I am very impressed by the quality of these photos.

And some shots of the 1:10 model Ottoman Dardanelles cannon, which I made a few years ago.  It was intended as a practice run in wood, before making it in bronze.  The wooden model is 600mm (2′) long, and since finishing it I have not felt the need to make a bronze example.  I plan to visit the original at Fort Nelson, Portsmouth, in a few weeks. Watch out for a video/photographs on johnsmachines.com

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I think that you will agree that the quality of these photos is excellent.  The photographer is still learning.

Model Ottoman Bombard – Painting

I would have preferred that the title of this blog was “Finishing the Ottoman Bombard”, but I am still waiting for the vectors of the barrel mouth decorations and Arabic (?) writing, and the touch hole.

But I have at least painted the bombard, and the pictures follow.  You will notice that I have not attempted to reproduce the bronze or copper colours of the orginal in Fort Nelson.  Partly because I doubted my ability to make painting such variegated patterns realistic, and partly because the cannon would not have looked like that in its heyday of 1464.  It would probably have been either black, like most SBML cannons (smooth bore muzzle loading), or possibly gaudy golds and reds and blues like other medieval items.  So I painted it black.  I like it.  If I get evidence that it should be more colourful I can change it later.

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First coat – Primer.  Hmmm… interesting colour.

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Next coat – matt black brushed on, to fill the hairline wood cracks.  Incidentally, the (dirty) parquetry floor is also made from the red gum house stumps from which the cannon is made.

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final two coats –  matt black, from a spray can. 

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So there it is, finished except for the barrel mouth engraving, and the touch hole.  Now what to do with it…   SWMBO says it might be useful as an umbrella stand.

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The breech.  25mm diameter explosion chamber.  1:10 scale

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The barrel, 63mm bore.

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Assembled.  The model is 520mm long.

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It does need some decoration

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Ottoman Bombard Photo to Vector

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This is the low res photo from Fort Nelson.  High res photo on its way.

In the meantime, I have contracted with a US firm to convert the picture to vectors.  More $US.  ($US50 to be exact).

I am not sure that this is going to work.  But I will report to you.

I do wonder what that the Arabic/Turkish writing means.  Does anyone know?  I am pretty sure  that it is not complimentary to Christians/Westerners/Non Muslims.  Maybe it is just an instruction not to look before the touch hole is touched.  Or “do not stand here”.

PS.  Note added 17 Oct 2016.    The translation is   “Help O God the Sultan Mehmet Khan son of Murad.  The work of Munir Ali in the month of Rejeb.  In the year 868.”

868 = 1464 ce.

 

TURKISH BOMBARD- HELP!

Does anyone have a decent photograph of the writing on the muzzle?

I have repeatedly hunted through every picture which I can find on the net, but they are either taken at an angle, or too poor quality to be useable.

Does anyone have a photograph which I could beg buy or borrow?

I also need a photo of the touch hole.

I have contacted the Fort Nelson Armoury Museum, but not too surprisingly there was no response.

Is there someone in the Portsmouth UK area who could pop in and take some pics for me?

POSTSCRIPT:  October 5.   I have had 2 excellent and positive responses to my appeal.

First, reader Richard sent me a connection to a Turkish Dr/Professor, who has made a 1:25 model of the bombard using 3D printing.  (at least that is how I think he has done it.  My Turkish is non existent).  I am following this lead.

Secondly I have had a response from Fort Nelson Armoury, with a good photo of the barrel mouth, and a high res photo on the way, after payment of a significant, but not unreasonable fee.  Isn’t the Internet wonderful!!

 

TURKISH BOMBARD – the real thing

I have found this video to be particularly useful in my modelling of the Ottoman bombard. The subject of this video is the gun that the Turkish sultan gifted to Queen Victoria when the Brits and the Turks were allies.  It might be one of the guns which fired on the British fleet in 1807, when it (the gun) was 343 years old!

Notice the colour.  It is aged bronze.  I am thinking about how to reproduce that colour on my model.

 

Length of the assembled gun 5.2m (17′)

Bore 635mm

Breech weight 8942kg

Barrel weight 8128kg

Average weight of shot 307kg

the model is at a scale of 1:10.  photos soon.  being painted.

 

Modelling A Turkish Bombard- The Pins

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There are 16 pins at each end of each section of the cannon.

These were certainly used as leverage points, for very strong men with large levers to rotate the 8-9  tonne segments against each other to engage and tighten the screw.

I cannot see how the pins would have been cast with the breech and barrel.  For my model I decided to make separate pins and fit them into the gap between the big rings, then insert a grub screw through both rings and the pin.  The holes are then filled.

I wonder if a similar method was used in 1464.  I would love to have a close look at the original cannon to figure this out.  From the photographs, I can see no evidence of later insertion of pins, but neither can I see how it would have been done any other way.

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Drilling the holes for the grub screws

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In order to continue with red gum, I made my own pins.  This is the setup.  The blank is held approximately centre in a 4 jaw….

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…and the pins are turned, centre drilled, drilled, cut to length,  and tapped M4.  64 altogether.

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The M4 x 25mm grubscrew is screwed into the pin.  The wood join is super glued.  Also, I am attempting to patch the worst of the thread tearouts.

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Using a battery screwdriver to insert the grub screws.  The pins protrude above the ring surface for a reason..

 

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Sanding the pins flush with the rings.  Check the photo of the original 1464 model.  There is also some wood filler in other splits.  Not surprising after holding up a house for 70 years.

The holes are now filled with wood filler, and will be sanded flush.  They should be invisible after painting.

Next the painting, the stands, and some cannon balls.  How to reproduce that aged copper colour…

 

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