Modelling A Turkish Bombard- The Pins

by John

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There are 16 pins at each end of each section of the cannon.

These were certainly used as leverage points, for very strong men with large levers to rotate the 8-9  tonne segments against each other to engage and tighten the screw.

I cannot see how the pins would have been cast with the breech and barrel.  For my model I decided to make separate pins and fit them into the gap between the big rings, then insert a grub screw through both rings and the pin.  The holes are then filled.

I wonder if a similar method was used in 1464.  I would love to have a close look at the original cannon to figure this out.  From the photographs, I can see no evidence of later insertion of pins, but neither can I see how it would have been done any other way.

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Drilling the holes for the grub screws

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In order to continue with red gum, I made my own pins.  This is the setup.  The blank is held approximately centre in a 4 jaw….

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…and the pins are turned, centre drilled, drilled, cut to length,  and tapped M4.  64 altogether.

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The M4 x 25mm grubscrew is screwed into the pin.  The wood join is super glued.  Also, I am attempting to patch the worst of the thread tearouts.

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Using a battery screwdriver to insert the grub screws.  The pins protrude above the ring surface for a reason..

 

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Sanding the pins flush with the rings.  Check the photo of the original 1464 model.  There is also some wood filler in other splits.  Not surprising after holding up a house for 70 years.

The holes are now filled with wood filler, and will be sanded flush.  They should be invisible after painting.

Next the painting, the stands, and some cannon balls.  How to reproduce that aged copper colour…