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machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Tag: triple expansion

Big Triple Expansion Steam Engines

I knew that the triple expansion engine at Kempton Pumping Station would not be steaming today, but I wanted to see it anyway.

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It is sited next to the Thames, and pumped water from the river up to a holding reservoir.

As I walked to the building I could see the outlines of the huge engines through the windows.

But it was closed!  Damnation!

But, a kind volunteer, hearing how far I had travelled, let me in, and gave cart blanche to wander at will.

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There are two of these 63′ high monsters.  This one has been restored, and is run on steam occasionally, after the boilers have been lit for 48 hours.  The other engine is currently being restored.  The crankshaft of the second one was rotated with the barring engine about half a revolution, after no use since 1985.  Of course it is a triple expansion steam engine, and it now is run on a newish boiler which is gas fired.  Unfortunately the old Lancashire (?) boilers were scrapped.

The interior of the building is also interesting.  The walls are glazed bricks which look like tiles, and there is a 20 ton gantry crane.  The engines weigh 1000 tons each, so must have been assembled on site.

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The walls are glazed bricks.  Note the piston rings on the walkway.

Below the engines are huge water pipes, pumps and valves.

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The space between the triples is occupied by two steam turbine driven pumps, about which more in a later post.  The space was originally intended to be occupied by another triple, which never occurred.   Interestingly, the triples are mirror images of each other, rather than identical, which means that a lot of components cannot be interchanged.  It probably made the plans more symmetrical and elegant.  Very British I suspect.

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Hey, that’s me.  In my tourist hiking gear

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Overall engine height 62 feet (18.9 meters)

 

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Monster big ends and cranks

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HP gauges.  Beautiful artwork hey Frank?!

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And aren’t those column bases works of art?

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Barring engine.  Steam powered

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Those are my fingers against the flywheel, and teeth for the barring engine.

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One of many oil distibutors

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Right on top of the LP

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Piston rod and crosshead

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On top of the world

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Looking down to a big end and the crankshaft

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Big machines need big nuts

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The HP cylinder

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A volunteer pointed out that some of the safety fence posts are recycled Boulton and Watt parallel motion bars!

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check out those cylinder diameters and clearances!

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Spare piston rings

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Piston ring, my finger

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Piston ring join.

I am rapidly running out of posting space, despite many more pics.  So I had better pause.  I didn’t get to the turbine engined pumps.  But I have many more photos…

Let me thank the very kind volunteers who spent time with me to talk about their engines at Kempton.  A marvellous experience.  I must return one day to see them under steam.

Triple retrospective

This post is for reader Roy, who asked how the triple expansion engine columns and base and cylinder blocks were aligned, and also about joint sealants.

To be honest, I did not really remember the details, but the posts on or close to Feb 2015 include the following photos.  The aluminium plates were precisely machined keep the column faces exactly separated by the final width.  The plates were bolted to the columns, then to each other.   I lined up the join in the plates with the center of the main bearing housings in the base plate.

The longitudinal alignment with the cylinder bores was determined by the precise drilling in the tops of the columns, and the cylinder base covers.  And a little longitudinal movement in the crankshaft allowed for a few thou discepancy.

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And this is what I used to steam proof the joins.  I used no gaskets.  The Loctite 567.  It was recommended by an expert friend who uses it on full size steam engines (thanks Tom!).  The Loxeal 58.11 is also excellent but it sets very hard, and is very difficult to separate later.

 

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How to time a Model Triple Expansion Steam Engine

The daunting aspect of timing the triple delayed the completion of mine by at least 6 months.  In the event, it was not difficult.

If timing a steam engine is not a particular concern of yours, I suggest that you turn off now.   Otherwise this will be particularly boring.  This post is in response to a request by a reader.

The engine needs to be pretty much completed and assembled.   Everything fitting.  Crankshaft rotating.  Valve rods tightened.  Stephenson’s reversing mechanism assembled and working. Cylinder drains installed.

Next I suggest that you make or buy a 360 degree protractor, and attach it to the crankshaft at the high pressure end.  Like this.

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Note that top dead centre (TDC) of each piston is marked (H,I,L), there is a pointer, big marks at 120 degree intervals, and identifiable marks at 10 and 5 degree intervals.  I added a rotation arrow later, because it is easy to mistake clockwise and anticlockwise directions when making adjustments.

Next, decide where in the cycle you want steam to be admitted.  On expert advice from a marine engineer who is also a model engineer, I decided to admit steam at 10 degrees after TDC. (thanks Rudi!).  I also decided to cut off admission of steam at about 70% of the  power stroke. (pretty standard).

The easiest valve to time is the low pressure valve.  It is on the end of the engine.  It is the biggest, and there is not much engine stuff getting physically in the way.  Despite that, I decided to start with the high pressure valve.  It also is on the outside end of the engine.  The reason is that I wanted to follow the passage of the steam flow, in order to understand what was happening.  Each cylinder is timed separately, independently.  So the order is, high pressure, intermediate pressure, low pressure.  Forward direction first, then reverse, for high, then F & R for IP, then F&R for LP.

The timing is adjusted by 1. changing the distance between the crankshaft and the valve, usually by adjusting the length of the valve rod and 2. by changing the position of the eccentric on the crankshaft.

Firstly, the valve must move equally over the steam inlet slots. (the top and bottom ports). The point at which the inlet slot starts to open is noted on the protractor for both steam inlet ports.  The number of degrees before or after TDC is noted for the top port, and the procedure is repeated for the bottom port.   For the bottom port Bottom Dead Centre (BDC) is the reference point on the protractor.  The angle should be identical for TDC and BDC.  If it not identical the length of the valve rod needs to be adjusted.  On my machine, that was done by adjusting the nuts holding the valve rod to the valve bracket, but it could be the valve rod to the eccentric strap.

Determining the point at which the steam inlet port starts to open is easy.  Remove the valve chest cover, bolt the valve chest to the cylinder block, and rotate the crankshaft by hand until the port is obviously visually open.  Cut a sliver of paper 5-10mm wide, (I used copy paper), measure the thickness of the paper (0.1mm in my case), insert the paper into the open port, rotate the crankshaft to close the port until the paper is jammed, then while applying tension to the paper, slowly rotate the crankshaft to open the port, until the paper just starts to move.  At that point the port will be open by the thickness of the paper.

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The valve cover is off, a sliver of paper is pushed a centimeter or so into the port, the crankshaft is rotated to jam the paper then the crankshaft is rotated in the direction that is being adjusted until the paper is just released.   At that point the port is open by the thickness of the paper.  I calculated that 0.1mm was equivalent approximately to 3 degrees of crankshaft rotation.  So whatever was displayed on the protractor, I subtracted 3 degrees to get to the exact point of port opening.

when the valve moves exactly equally up and down over the steam entry ports, the point of opening is noted on the protractor relative to TDC of BDC, depending on which is being measured.

The eccentric grubscrew needs to be loosened, and  rotated on the crankshaft to bring the point of port opening to 10 degrees past TDC.  Then the grubscew is tightened.  BDC will automatically be correct if the centering process has been done accurately.

I had bored a hole in the eccentric strap to allow access to the grubscrew from underneath the engine.  That meant that the crankshaft had to be in a certain position to allow access to the grubscrew, not necessarily TDC or BDC or whatever.  That does not matter.  What matters is that the eccentric is rotated a certain number of degrees on the crankshaft.  I did this by using the Allen key to loosen the grubscrew, then using the Allen key to hold the eccentric fast, while rotating the crankshaft.  Then tighten the grubscrew, being careful to not move the eccentric.   The measurements need to be rechecked of course.   With practice, it is not difficult, and can be accomplished first go in most cases.

If this all sounds complicated and difficult, it really is not.  But I did need to make a record of every step and measurement and direction.

For the intermediate cylinder, the HP cylinder block needs to be removed.  The HP valve chest can be retained, just swung out of the way, retaining the previous settings..  You have to be careful, but this method does save a heap of bother.

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One thing I would suggest.  When the opening points of both IP inlet ports are determined and set, I suggest that before the HP cylinder block is reassembled, that the IP valve rod is measured above the IP valve chest.  And that the measurements are recorded and placed in a secure vault.  Those measurements can be used for any future adjustments of the IP valve, without the time consuming and very fiddly necessity of removing the HP cylinder block.

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I have determined the opening points for the intermediate cylinder using the paper method.  With the depth micometer on the valve rod above the valve chest, I am measuring and recording those positions, for possible future use.

And I have a confession.  The next photo shows the HP upper cylinder drain, and the same view at top dead centre.  As you can see, at TDC the piston blocks the drain.)!*!)  Read on.

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There is another method for determining the opening point of the valves.

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Plastic tubes are pushed on suitable points for the cylinder to be set, in this case the HP. The valve is pushed against the valve face, in this case with rubber bands.  One blows into the appropriate tube while rotating the crankshaft.  When the port starts to open, you can hear your exhaled breath coming through (if your hearing is OK, which mine is not).  The protractor reading is recorded, and used as before.   Note:  the drain cock passages MUST NOT be occluded by the piston at TDC or BDC.  In my case, this proved to be a problem, hence the use of the strip of paper method.

So, I hope that this is of some use.  If my description is jaberwocky, please send a message and I will try to help.    John.

TRIPLE EXPANSION MODEL ENGINE- FIRST RUN (air)

This is a short video of the first run of the Bolton9 Model Triple Expansion Steam Engine, which I have been building on and off over the past 3 years.

The video is a bit shakey, because it is taken on my hand held phone while I am using he other hand to operate the controls.  I really did not expect the engine to work!

It runs a bit roughly, and is still quite tight, but settles down in the final few seconds.

It is not running very smoothly, because it is on air rather than steam, and because it is probably only powered on the high pressure cylinder, and maybe a bit on the intermediate, and not at all on the low pressure cylinder.

The next day it would not run.  Very frustrating.  I suspect that one of the eccentrics slipped on the crankshaft, and threw the timing out.  Not the easily accessible low or high pressure valve, but the intermediate one, which needs another teardown to get to it.

But Hey!  It will work.  I can see the light at the end of the tunnel.

One of my readers has requested a description of the triple engine timing procedure, so that will appear on this blog soon.  Unless you have a particular need for the timing info I suggest that you give that post a miss.

Triple Expansion Steam Engine Cylinder Cocks

Some further progress on the triple.

I bought cylinder cocks from Reeves UK, and the picture shows them fitted.  In case I eventually install a mechanism to open all of the cocks simultaneously, they are in straight line, which necessitated making extension peices for the high pressure cylinder cocks.

The handles required bending to clear the pipework.

The cocks look a bit strange to me.  Too big, and the handles are wrong.   I am thinking about making a set from scratch.  But that can wait.

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Drain pipes from the cocks will be installed at some stage.  Still deciding where to run them. And whether to join them into a common trunk.

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The engine turns over by hand, but it is still a bit stiff.  There was a tight spot which took many hours to locate.  It turned out to be a valve rod thread which was about 0.5mm too long, touching the inside of the high pressure valve chest.   Fixed in a jiffy.

I hooked up the engine to a small compressor at 30psi, but general stiffness prevented the engine from rotating.  So I gave it an hour being rotated in the lathe at 200 rpm.  It is noticeably more free, and getting very close to working.  The valve timing is approximately correct (checked by my expert friends Thomas L, and Rudi V), but will need fine tuning at some stage.

More Triple Photos

Reader Richard suggested that I include a ruler in some of the triple photos, for a sense of scale, so here it is.

It is approx 300mm long 200mm wide and 270mm high.  Weighs 12.4 kg.

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Triple Expansion Steam Engine Pipework.

I am close to disassembling the Bolton 9, before gradually reassembling it in preparation for running it on air then steam.  Most of the components have now been made.  Most recently I completed the pipework associated with the Edwards air pump and the twin water pumps.

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This is the combined air and water pumps, and new pipework.  Most joins are silver soldered, but a couple are Loctited.  Loctite should be adequate.  These components will not get super hot.

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This valve is one of the few components on this engine which I have not personally made.  This one came from the effects of the late Harry Close, who was a valued member of our Model Engineering Club.

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The pipework adds to the overall interest , yes?  It will look good when polished.

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And the “tails” for the valve rods, which are attached to their respective steam chests.  The BA7 bolts are a bit oversized for the job.  The intermediate cylinder tail screws into place.  I am not sure why it is different from the other two.

So now I am making a list of tasks which need to be completed when the engine is taken apart, hopefully for the last time before it is run.  The list is not complete, and so far it runs to 3 pages.  Mostly like fixing parts which interfere with each other, and freeing up tight bearings.

I will take some pics of the components.

Edwards Pump for the Triple Expansion Steam Engine

The triple expansion steam engine has been progressing, again.  I started this project over 2 years ago, but I have taken many breaks, some prolongued.  One break lasted over 6 months while I made some cannons.

I cannot remember when I made the Edwards pump for the triple, but it must be over a year ago.   In the past few days I have returned to it, finalising the mounting to the engine, and joining the driving levers to the pump and the engine.

The Edwards pump creates the vacuum in the condenser chest.  It is an air pump.

Attached to the Edwards pump are 2 water pumps, which return condensed steam as water, to the boiler.  At least that is what I understand from the descriptions.  It feels a bit odd, making these components before understanding what they really do.

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The Edwards pump is the central cylinder and rod.  The water pumps, bolted to the sides, are just lumps of semi machined cast gunmetal at the stage this photo was taken.

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The step before the above picture, where the base of one water pump is machined.

 

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The Edwards pump, and the 2 water pumps, almost finished, attached to the engine.

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There is no clearance between the pump gland and the condensor, so the intitial hexagonal glands which I made (not shown) were unuseable.  So I made these cylindrical glands which required a tiny hook  spanner to tighten.  The hook spanner was made on the CNC mill from 1/8″ brass plate.  A little filing was required to shape the hooked tooth.  Works nicely.

 

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The pump unit, lower left, attached to the engine.  Actuating levers driven off the low pressure cylinder (not yet connected).

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The pump unit viewed from the side.

So I am at the stage where I would like this project to be finished, so I can get on with other projects.  It feels like it is close because there are very few castings remaining in the box.  But I know that the entire engine has to be disassembled, and painstakingly reassembled, freeing up some of the tight parts so it will turn over more easily.  Then the steam pipe hookups and valve timing.  Then hopefully, a video of it running!

Assembling the Triple

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I got this far in assembling the model triple expansion steam engine, then lost courage and put it aside (again).  You can see the high pressure steam chest labelled “top”, the steam valve and handle, the drag links and levers for the reversing mechanism for the high pressure cylinder, and the worm and gear and control wheel for the reversing mechanism.   The reversing levers will need pinning with taper pins when the correct positions are finalised.  The short rod in the middle of the pic is temporary.  I need to make those properly.  The drag links clash with the condenser cover.  That was predicted in Bertinat’s notes.  The cover will need some material removed.  Slowly progressing, but taking frequent breathers.

The high pressure mechanisms are the most exposed, and easiest to access, and they were very tricky, and not yet compeletely installed.  I dread to consider what the intermediate pressure ones will be like, buried in the middle of the engine.   Then there is the valve timing.  Help!

Anyone for a swim?

High summer.

Hot workshop, wearing only shorts and boots.

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I think that I will stay in the workshop.

Today was my deadline to have the triple expansion steam engine assembled and working, ready to be hooked up to steam at the Geelong Truck show.

GSMEE (Geelong Society of Model and Experimental Engineers) has a display in the Vintage Machinery Shed at the show, with many small working steam engines and the odd IC engine running.  Plus the Vintage Engine group has many full size engines running….  always a really interesting place to visit.

Another full day in the workshop would have just about had the triple in the display.  Unfortunately, I lost a day having to get a dental root canal abcess reamed out.

Then the day before yesterday, I could not find the drag links for my triple.   I had made them in early December,  and I was sure that I had put them in the multi- compartmented box where I store all such bits.  Despite thoroughly searching the box, at least 20 times, they were not there.  Could I have put them down somewhere else in the workshop?  So I searched the workshop.  No luck.  So I tidied the workshop, putting tools away, sweeping up rubbish, all the while searching.  Still no luck.   So I cleaned and searched my car, my bedroom, the living room, every where that I could concievably have left them.  (OK, I did not actually clean the bedroom and living room, but I did search).   I grilled my wife.  Had she seen them?  No.

So I slept on the problem.  Next day was going to be hot, so at 7am I drove to the workshop (it is about 15km from home), and searched again.   Still no luck.

So I searched the multi compartmented box for the 21st time.  I knew that it was a waste of time, but I was seriously considering making a new lot of drag links and bearings, probably a 2 day task.

There were some tiny containers with tiny fasteners in the compartmented box.  The drag links could not be them because they are too big, aren’t they…..??

The first tiny container, contained, you guessed it, the drag links.!!  They were smaller than I remembered.

Relief!

Self disgust!

Age related loss of short term memory…..

I had to get that one off my chest.

The other thing that I wanted to mention, is a superb machining blog site.  Actually, 2 superb machining blog sites.

The first is by Joe Pieczynski, who is a Texan who makes his living from machining.  His techniques and teaching are really, very, excellent.  Aimed mainly at an audience who are beyond absolute beginners.  Do a Youtube search on “Joe Pieczynski”.  Look at his video on machining ultrathin materials.

The second, I have probably mentioned before.  An Australian  machinist, whose videos and machining techniques have to be seen to be believed.  Mainly with a clock making interest, but the techniques can be used by all of us.  For some reason I cannot cut and paste his Youtube connection, but you will find it by doing a search on “Clickspring”.  What is particularly exciting in Chris’s “Clicksping” is that he is soon to embark on remaking an Antikythera calculator.  Watch it!  You will be hooked.

 

 

 

 

 

The Steam Supply Valve

This valve is the one which opens the steam supply from the boiler to the engine.  Triple expansion sgeam engines require a minimum of 100 psi, and preferably 120-200psi.  But amteur built boilers are rarely certified above 100 psi.

But compressed air gets to 120 psi with no drama.  So guess what will power this engine until I get around to making a high pressure boiler.

So the on-off valve needs to be pretty solid, so it does not explode and send hot fragments of metal in all directions.

Here is the main supply valve as specified and built for my triple expansion steam engine.

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The lines in the background are a ruled exercise book, just to give a sense of the scale.  There are 9 components of precision machined components in this picture.  And about 2-3,  8-12 hr very happy days in the workshop to make.  This is all made from bar stock.

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And this is the handle which controls the on – off steam supply.  Pretty sexy hey?

It all attaches to the high pressure steam chest and cylinder.

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Hey!  I like this shit stuff .  Even if most of the rest of humanity is yawning.


 

SS Valve Rods

Making the new valve rods, as predicted, took me an entire day.  They required a high degree of precision, and being in stainless steel, not an easy material to machine, and quite thin and delicate, multiple stages in the machining.

But before I started on the valve rods I made myself a new spanner for the collet chuck on the CNC lathe.  I had been using an adjusting spanner, which was continually  going out of adjustment and causing angst.  The tool merchants did not have anything suitable (46mm opening, and thin profile), so I made my own.

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The 46mm spanner being cut from 6mm steel plate.

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It is a bit prettier after this photo and being painted.  The rounded jaws facilitate easy application to the collet chuck.

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Tightening the ER40 collet chuck with the new spanner.  It works very well.

So then I got on with the new valve rods.  Some end of day photos follow.

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The valve rod is the silver coloured rod.  Actually stainless steel.  This photo shows the high pressure cylinder valve and valve chest.  There are 2 other valves, one for each cylinder.  All different sizes.

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The high pressure valve chest and valve, the valve rod and guide.  On the right is the Stevenson’s link, yokes and eccentrics which control forward and reverse.  This setup is repeated for each of the 3 cylinders.  This is hooked upto the worm and gear which was shown a blog or two ago.  There are 22 components for each, not counting fasteners.

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The low pressure setup.

And thank you to those readers who responded to my whinge about likes and comments.  I will continue this blog until the triple expansion steam engine is finished, and hopefully running.  Not sure after that.

Triple Underbelly

“Underbelly” has a particular resonance for readers who know what the Yarra is and that Collingwood is a place and not a British admiral.

In the instance of my triple expansion steam engine, it refers to the bits and pieces underneath the cylinder block.  The glands which prevent steam leaks from the con rods and steam valve rods, the and valve rod guides.  These unsung heroes of the steam engine have taken 2 entire days to make.   And here they are….

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This is the cylinder block, upside down.   You can see the valve rods. the valve rod guides, the valve rod glands, the piston rods, the cross heads (unfinished), the piston rod glands,  and the cylinder bases.   Give yourself 2 marks for each correctly identified item.  The 6 hex plugs on the side are temporary, until I get around to making some cylinder drain valves.

I started to count the number of holes drilled and tapped in this view, but gave up at 100 and still not half way.  This engine better bloody work!

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Note the letter stamped into the cylinder base.  Many parts are similarly stamped.   The studs in the intermediate piston gland are temporary.

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Just a different view.

I have decided to replace the valve rods which are made of brass, with stainless steel ones. That will take an extra day, which might exceed my second, self imposed, deadline.  But if it does, well too bad.

By the way….   I am considering whether or not to continue this blog.   It does take time, and is not free.  If you read this and are not totally bored, the odd “like” would not go un-noticed.  A comment would be even better.

Reversing Gears and Handwheel

Another 2 days in the workshop.  Heaven.

I had made a worm drive and gear using an M14 x 2 tap, but it did not look the part, despite being functional.   The problem was that the threads were sharp triangular and they did not look correct.

So I made a worm drive and gear using Acme specifications.  The teeth have a chunkier squarish look.  More authentic.

I ground a lathe cutter and used it to make the worm drive in gunmetal, and another identical thread in 14mm silver steel (drill rod).   The steel thread had cutting edges formed, and when finished it was hardened by heating red hot and quenching.  After hardening, a file would not mark it.  I did not bother to anneal it, since it would be used only to cut cut brass or gunmetal.  The hardened tool was used to make a gear in gunmetal.  Unfortunately I did not take pictures of those steps.

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Showing the handwheel, worm drive and gear.  the shaft is mounted in gunmetal bearings which are bolted to the columns with BA8 bolts.    The thread is Acme. 2mm pitch.  The handwheel will control forward-reverse of the triple expansion steam engine.

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In order to determine the position of the bearing bolt holes for the worm drive, I used SuperGlue to tempararily join the worm and gear.  

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When the position of the bearings was determined, the holes were drilled 1.8mm and tapped.  the taps were BA8, about 2mm diameter.  The engine is held vertically on the milling table, being cramped to a large angle plate.  The holes were drilled accurately on the mill.  The threads were made using a tapping head made by me from plans published in “Model Engineer” by Mogens Kilde.   The double parallelogram of the tapping tool keeps the tap vertical.  The tap did not break.

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Close up photo of tapping the BA8 threads.  Showing the bearing, shaft, worm drive and gear.  Note the Acme thread.  The bearing is Super Glued into position to facilitate the drilling and tapping procedure.  The Super Glue will be removed later.

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The final step for today was to make the handwheel.  It is 1.5″ diameter.  The rim is 1/8″ brass and the spokes are 1/16″ brass.  I made 4 of these, with each being better than the last.  I softened the 1/8th brass before winding it around a 32mm pipe to form the rim.  The join in the rim was silver soldered.  Then the rim and the hub were drilled using a tilting indexing head on the mill.  I soft soldered the spokes on intital handwheels, but the final (and best) examples were glued with Loctite.  Loctite allows a few minutes for adjustment of the spoke lengths, whereas there is only one go with the soldering.

It is looking interesting, Yes?  And there are 3 spare handwheels.  The rest of the reversing mechanism components were made several months ago.  Almost ready to install them.

Broken Tap Removal

In a previous post I admitted to breaking a BA7 tap in the Edwards air pump of the Triple Expansion Engine, and being unable to remove it.

The hole being threaded was one of 4 to be used to hold a water pump to the air pump. It was 2.5mm diameter (i.e. pretty tiny)

I tried to grasp with pliers the fragment still protruding but it then broke below the surface.

I tried to break up the embedded tap, using a HSS punch, with partial but inadequate success.

I briefly considered drilling a hole from the other end, and punching in the reverse direction, but that would really have compromised the pump.

So I decided that the three remaining bolts would have to be enough.

A night sleeping on the problem.

Next day, with a fresh determination, I decided to attack the problem again.

I had some used carbide milling cutters 2mm diameter, and I was prepared to sacrifice one or two of them.   So I carefully set up the Edwards pump in the milling machine.

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You can see the three good tapped holes.  The carbide milling cutter chomped away at the broken tap, and using gentle pressure, and ignoring the metallic screeches, the tap was broken up and most of the fragments came out.  I was prepared to sacrifice the milling bit, but it seems to have survived this insult.  The harder metal always wins.   It was probably fortunate that the tap was carbon steel and not HSS.

Somewhat surprisingly, the tapped hole was in reasonable condition, and it accepted a BA7 bolt, although I will not be aggressively tightening this one.

Triple Expansion Steam Engine -The water pump

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The triple will not be finished by Xmas.  No chance of getting into the workshop while we are looking after 2 grandchildren.  So the new aiming completion date is Jan 6, in time to run the triple on steam at the Geelong truck show.   If I don’t meet that deadline, the next access to steam will be the end of 2017.  I really do not want to wait that long.

So the next component to produce out of a chunk of gunmetal is the water pump.

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There are two cylinders in the water pump.  The gunmetal castings appear to be good quality.

Most of the machining will be done on the mill.  But I need a datum surface, and have decided that the attachment plate is the most appropriate.

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I do not need the small cylindrical protruberance, but that chunk of gunmetal might be handy for something else (eg as a bushing), so I parted it off and saved it.  Lovely parting tool is from Eccentric Engineering.

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Then turned a flat surface.  On the mill I machined it to a rectangle.   Diamond tool is also from Eccentric Engineering.

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The two water pump cylinders are bolted to the air pump.  BA7.  A broken tap is entombed in the air pump forever.

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When I get back into the workshop I will machine the rest of the pump parts.

MAKING SMALL SPLIT BEARINGS FOR THE TRIPLE EXPANSION STEAM ENGINE

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The bearings in the drag link are not split, because they can be slid onto the shaft.  But if there are obstructions to sliding, (such as big ends on a crankshaft), the bearings must be split, and assembled when in position on the shaft.  The bore in the intact bearings in the photo is 4mm.  The split bearings have a 5mm bore.  They are all bronze, but the split bearings have been heated then dipped in sulphuric acid so the colour has changed.

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The first step in making split bearings is to machine 2 strips of metal, of identical dimensions.

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Next the strips are soldered together.

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The bearing holes are drilled and reamed exactly to finished size.

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The strip of soldered metals is attached to a sacrificial base plate and the outside of the bearings are machined to final size and shape.

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Holes are drilled to take the bolts which will eventually hold the halves of the bearings together.  (1.6mm holes in this case).  The bearings are then heated to melt the solder and separate the halves of the bearings.  Sulphuric acid was used to remove the carbonised crap left on the surface of the bronze by the heating torch.

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The bosses around the holes was an extra machining step.

Drag

Not what you thought.

Today I made the rest of the drag links for the triple expansion steam engine, and just for fun I made one spare.

I ran out of BA10 nuts.  Ordered more.  1.6mm thread, 3mm overall diameter, 200 of them weighs nothing.  But if I drop one, that is another 25 cents down the drain, because individually they are invisible.

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Drag Links for Reversing Mechanism on Triple Expansion Steam Engine

A bit more progress today.

I spent the whole day making these drag links, and I was pretty happy with the result.

Then I realised that I need 6, and I had made only 3.  (well there are 3 cylinders you see).

So you know what I will be doing tomorrow….

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The drag links are the 3 items with the bearings at the ends, and the connecting rods.  Those rods are 1.6mm diameter (1/16″ inch), and the nuts are BA 10

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I dropped 2 of the nuts.  Gone forever.

The final 20% takes 80% of the time

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The weighshaft, supported on its brackets.  It will be pinned with taper pins to the shaft.  Also finished the reversing lever and reversing arm.  The reversing arm has gunmetal bushes.  About 2 x 8 hour days in the workshop to make these bits.  Just as well it is a fun hobby.

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