johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment. I read every comment and respond to most.

Tag: Armstrong cannon model

Model Armstrong Cannon. Assembling the bits. And a riveting improvement.

After 4 -6 weeks of making castings, and remaking them, and remaking  them again, I have finally started drilling holes and bolting pieces together, in preparation for final riveting.

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I ground a 2mm diameter end on my centre punch so I could transfer the cast holes on the brackets to the sides of the carriage for drilling.  (using a toolpost grinder on my lathe to grind the center punch.)

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Center popping

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I could not resist pushing some parts together to visualise how the carriage will appear.  10 wheels per carriage to be made.   This is the “B” carriage, on which I try out the techniques.

More riveting.

Using my new riveting gun, I inserted a lot more rivets on the “A” chassis…and I used a technique suggested by one of my readers…bearing in mind that my first riveting efforts marred the surface of the parent metal, and were generally rather irregular rather than neat.

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Virtually NO surface dents, very regular, a big improvement.   I had intended to polish out the machining swirls, but SWMBO said that they were appealing and interesting.

And the technique was this….

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The rivets are inserted 5-10 at a time, then the heads are covered with tape.  Duct tape in this case.  The work is then turned over, and the rivets do not fall out.

Each rivet head is centered over the anvil, and the pneumatic gun is used with the snap on the other end.   The tape stops the rivets from falling out, and also protects the parent metal from the snaps.  I experienced virtually no parent metal bruising.  And was VERY fast.  A major improvement.  Many thanks Timothy G!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video of Casting Small Complex Cannon Parts

This video was taken and edited by my daughter Eleanor.  I was doing an aluminium pour of some parts for the Armstrong RML cannon, explaining the process to her.  I was hardly aware that she was videoing, so the interaction is conversational.

Although the pour was not a success because none of the parts were good enough to use, it does show the process as seen by someone who previously knew nothing about it.

 

 

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There is also a 20 minute video of the whole process which I will add to this post when it is available.

Reader Rob has suggested that the positions of the defects suggests that air entrapment is the cause of the voids and that the fix is to position some vents at the positions at risk.  I will try that with my next pour.  Thanks Rob.

Here is the 22 minute video.  Just as recorded.  Not planned or edited.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Armstrong Cannon Wheel Assemblies -2

rear wheel and support

There are 3 major components of each wheel assembly, plus the wheel, axle, and king pin.

The wheels, axles and king pins are straight forward metal turning, but the other 3, the wheel bracket, the king pin post, and the chassis bracket, are castings in the original.

For my 1:10 model I am planning to cast the king pin column, and the wheel bracket.  But I will fabricate the chassis brackets.

There is one chassis bracket for each of the 4 chassis wheels, and they are all different.  Front different from rear, left and right hand versions.  And each one has angles of 90º, 30º, 20º, 6º, 2º so the machining was quite a mental exercise.  No major stuff ups though.

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Here is the main component of the left hand rear chassis bracket, being held in position.  It will be bolted on later, and have several flanges silver soldered to it.   Those M2 cap screws will be replaced by rivets eventually.

Meanwhile, having decided to cast the king pin casing, and the wheel bracket, I spent many pleasant hours (or was it days?), drawing them.  Then yesterday, I 3D printed an example of the king pin casings.

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2.5 hours to print PLA examples of rear (left) and front king pin casings.  I need to see the original cannon to check some details before committing to cast these in bronze.  The PLA parts will disappear during during the casting process.  (A pity.  They are quite attractive No?)  You can see why I chose not to machine them out of bar stock.   3 pin holes in the left hand print ? the result of not storing the PLA spool in a dehumidified container.

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So, it might not look like several days of computer and workshop time, but that is how long it has taken.

In Australia we have had some easing of Covid-19 restrictions, but not opening of museums or historic collections of cannons.  So I still cannot go to Warnambool (a 2.5 hour drive) to check details on their Armstrong 80 pounder rifled muzzle loader.  Flagstaff Hill Maritime Museum does not answer their phone.  Hmmm.  Maybe I could climb the fence and sneak in……    but maybe not.