3D Printing is SLOW

by John

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Crealty CR-10s 3D printer.  The machinists parallels were my solution to ensuring that the horizontal arm is parallel to the base frame.

So, I took delivery of the 14kg box, and spent a couple of hours assembling the printer.  It was partly assembled, as delivered, and if I had known what I was doing the final assembly would have been done in a fraction of the time.  The assembly instructions were adequate.  The wiring connections were well labelled.  The wiring connectors were delicate, and I took care not to bend or break them.

The vertical frame bolts to the base frame, and it is surprisingly rigid.  There are 2 Z axis stepper motors, and when not powered up, they can be individually turned.  It occurred to me that the horizontal arm which the Z axis motors raise and lower should be exactly parallel to the base, so I placed the machinist’s parallels as shown in the above photo and screwed the horizontal arm down onto the parallels to set the horizontal position.  I assume that the Z steppers will move the arm equally. (Hmm… I will check that assumption later.)

Next day, I downloaded the operating software.  An older version was supplied with the machine, and the newer version would not work on my old XP Pro Windows computer, so I used the old version.

I spent some time manually levelling the bed, then ran the automatic bed levelling software.

The printed operating instructions are very basic.  An Internet connection is assumed, and I did not have one available, so my first printed object was with default settings and the supplied white filament.

Somewhat to my surprise, it worked.

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The platten is aluminium.  A glass plate was also supplied, so I used that on top of the aluminium.

The filename was “dog”.  I had no idea whether “dog” was a 3D dog, a picture, or whatever.  Neither did I have any idea of its size.  After an hour, I had printed a disk about 125mm diameter and 1.1mm thick.  Then the disk came off the platten, so I aborted the print.

Today, after getting some advice from Stuart T regarding print adhesion I removed the glass platten cover and applied some special adhesive 3D printer cover.  It is called “3M double coated tissue tape 9080A”.  Then I printed 2 more items.  Neither broke free.  in fact they were difficult to remove at the conclusion of the prints.

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This tiny Tyranosaurus was printed from a 3D file which I found on my computer.  It printed in about 20 minutes.  Default settings again.  The supports were too big for the object, and when I broke them free I also broke off the T Rex arms.  Some settings for supports need to be changed.

The next print was a tool which I planned for the 3D printer…..

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The item is a speed handle for a milling vise.  It is 80mm diameter with some grippy indentations on the circumference.  The tricky feature to make is the hex hole, to fit a 19mm hex shaft.  This is the 3D drawing, imported into the Creality software, so the G code can be generated.

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First layers.  Each layer is 0.2mm thick

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The internal framework is a bit lighter than I wanted.  I thought that I had chosen 90% density.

 

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The speed handle on the vise.  Nice fit.  The print took over 2 hours.

Not perfect, but too bad at all.