johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Category: Tools.

CNC Lathe Toolpost Mill

Just a quickie to show you a progress photo of my current project.

It is a very small milling motor with a small ER collet, mounted onto the toolpost of my Boxford CNC lathe, which will convert the lathe from 2 to 3 axes.

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At this early stage the toolpost holder and cylindrical motor have been mounted to the water jet cut bracket on the right side.  Pulleys and drive belt yet to be fitted and I will trim the shaft at the left hand end of the motor.  Then the motor wires are connected to a speed and direction and on-off controller.

The usefulness of this tool is apparent in the following video of a completed unit in use.  The main spindle motor of the lathe is now a 750w AC servo motor, which can be controlled from Mach 3, to go to programmed positions and hold the position while a milling procedure takes place.  Of course the milling procedure will be with small cutters or drills, perhaps up to 3-4mm diameter.

The idea, plans, and some of the parts are courtesy of Stuart Tankard, my very clever friend, whose completed machine is the subject of the following video.

Stuart’s video is republished here with permission.  The original, with comments, is visible on YouTube.  If you have technical questions about the setup, I suggest that you contact Stuart via his YouTube post.

CONFESSION

When I was making the triple expansion steam engine I turned the crankshaft from a piece of 50mm diameter stainless steel rod.   One centre for the main bearings, and 3 other eccentric centres for the big ends.  I spent a long time marking out the centres, then turned the bearings, gluing in a packing piece after turning each one, so that pressure on the ends of the crankshaft would not distort it.

After a whole day on the job, I was pretty pleased with the progress, and I lined up the almost finished crankshaft with the bearings on the bed, to see how it would look.

#%&*##

I had made a 3mm mistake with the position of one of the big ends.  It was a fatal mistake.

So I made another crankshaft the next day, and that one worked out fine, and is on the triple to this day.

The ruined crankshaft sits prominently on a shelf in my workshop, as a reminder.

Today I am making another confession, of another stupid mistake.

This was a beautifully smooth, accurate, keyless Rohm chuck which I used often in my mill, mounted on a quick release quality JT6 Japanese fitting.  I used it successfully on drills down to 1mm size for several years.

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But lately it seemed to have a bit of runout.  Inspection appeared to show that the JT6 taper part of the chuck had dislodged a bit.  Not the taper itself, but the sleeve that the taper was machined into.

So, I put it in the press to snug it back home.

No movement, so I pushed a bit harder.  (stupid stupid stupid!)

BANG!

I don’t know what let go, but I think that I cracked the tapered sleeve.  The chuck was seized solid.  Would not move despite heavy persuasion.  I had really buggered it.

O well, you live and learn.  I figured that I would remove the chuck, buy a new one, and install it on the expensive Japanese JT6 spindle.

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So I applied a gear remover, one of those double C shaped ones, with the hardened steel jaws, and tightened the bolts.  But it would not move.  Tightened the bolts further, and further, until I was not game to apply more pressure for fear of breaking the gear remover or the Sidchrome spanner.   Considered applying heat with oxyacetylene, but I really did not want to wreck the Japanese fitting as well, so I put the question to a colleague at the model engineering club today.  As a result of that conversation, this is what I did…..with an angle grinder.

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As you can see.

I considered putting it on the shelf next to the crankshaft, but you know what…. I don’t think that I can bear to look at it, so it is going out with the rubbish to be forgotten as quickly as possible.  (ps.  now sitting next to the crankshaft)

The JT6 spindle seems to survived unscathed.

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The other side of the chuck and the spindle, after separation.

In retrospect, I wonder if I should have tried some heat, but the chuck was busted, so it would not have made much difference.

End of confession.  But I dont feel any better.

A VIDEO GIMBAL

A gimbal is a device which keeps an object on a steady horizontal level, even as its support moves and tilts.   Such as a ship’s compass.

Hand held videos often show unwanted evidence of movements due to shaking, walking or distractions.

Expensive gimbals have been available to professionals for a long time.  Recently gimbals have become much less expensive, and available to people shooting videos on smart phones, mirrorless cameras, and DSLR’s.

The following video was shot on my iphone, without a gimbal, but about a gimbal, which I recently purchased.  The video is brief, and not intended to be anything but a glimpse.  To be honest, there is a bit of a learning curve with the gimbal, and I am just beginning.

I hope that it will help to improve my video shoots.

ZHIYUN CRANE M2

Workshop with security

Every time that I open my workshop I wonder if it will have been robbed.  So far, I have had unsecured implements which are stored outside, stolen, and an attempt at stealing my Landcruiser ute, but no breaking and entering of the workshop itself.  Mind you, any thief would have a tough time working out what to take…   everything is scattered around, sitting where I last used it.  And then there are the tiger snakes….

Reader Brendan has a couple of guard dogs for his workshop when he is not present.

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They might not look too scary, but they do make a hell of a racket when a stranger approaches.

And Brendan’s workshop is not all in one location.  I counted 5 separate locations….

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The computer room and security monitor.  Mostly CAD and G codes here.

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The laser cutter occupies the entry porch.   See the backing board pattern?  That is from the gasket for my Trevithick engine.

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Then the main workshop.  Hmm… what is that red thing?

Brendan bearing press

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2 lathes in the garage.  Hafco with DRO, and CNC with Siemens controller.

Meanwhile, in my workshop…

I am taking some of my stuff to an exhibition at the Royal Geelong Show in a week.  The beam engine working on steam always gets some interest.   And the Trevithick dredger engine has not featured at this event before, so that can go.   I am currently working on the vertical boiler.   The Southworth Duplex pump which is attached to the boiler, was working on air, but it refused on steam, so another tear down is due.  If I can get it going that will be the third entry.  If not, well, there is always next year.   Fortunately Keith Appleton recently produced some videos on the Southworths, one of which had a similar problem, so I think that I know where my problem is.

Incidentally,  I showed the beam engine, the Trevithick, and the boiler at an exhibition in Melbourne last weekend.   Mostly well received.  But I had a succession of people who said of the beam engine “very nice.  Except for the cap screws.”  When it reached 6 separate commenters on the same theme I was starting to suspect a conspiracy from these rivet counters.   Yes it does have cap screws as the main fasteners.  And no, they are not true to the period (late 19th century).  But I quite liked the look of them.  But, one does prefer approval in preference to criticism, and after this concerted barrage of criticism, I relented, and spent a couple of workshop sessions swapping out the cap screws for studs with hex nuts.

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The before.  With cap screws.

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After the upgrade with studs and hex nuts.  Was it worth the 2 workshop sessions?

Sometime soon I will paint parts of this engine, and apply wooden lagging to the cylinder.

 

 

A Workshop as Dark, Messy, and Dirty as Mine! Well, almost.

These shots were sent in by reader Russ, from Tasmania.  He reckons that he will tidy up the shop after retirement…. Ha!   Little does he know, that there is less spare time after stopping work…  there is so much other fun stuff to do.

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Is that a Porsche 924 or 928?

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No!  Much better! It is a Jensen Interceptor Mk 1. Love that aesthetic rear window.   Beautiful Tasmanian landscape.  Number plate ablated by me.

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Now that is a real man-cave!

I think that I still win the prize for the messiest, dirtiest, darkest workshop, but Russ comes in a close second.  Note that Russ is a busy surgeon.  Hmmm.

 

 

Workshop in the Deep North of Oz. North Queensland.

This one is interesting.  It is located in the basement of a multi storey apartment building,  in the centre of a major city, and occupies a car parking space.  It is screened off from the other car parking spaces, with security mesh and visual blocking.

In the photos you will see some of Peter’s projects.  Woodworking, kids toys, and metalworking.  Peter also is involved in model railways.

Nice to see some mess.  Must be genetic.

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Nice bandsaw!  I wonder what the bell is used for.  Maybe to warn the other apartment occupants that Peter is about to fire up some machinery.

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Heavy duty lathe.

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It is obviously used!

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A grand daughter will be very happy with that!

Thanks for those photos Peter.  It is interesting to see another workshop in confined space.  I do wonder how the other apartment occupants respond to woodworking thicknesser noise.

A European Workshop

Most of the workshop pictures so far have come from Australia, and one from UK.  This one is from Holland, sorry Huib, the Netherlands.

Interesting differences.  Huib built his own workshop, and he has some nice gear.  All of these photos came upside-down.  Funny how they consider Oz to be “down-under”.  Obviously their reference points are wrong. THEY are the upside-down ones.  I mean, we are walking upright, right?  They must be upside-down!

 

Hello John,

Here finally my contribution to your workshop series, as always I might want to show and share too much with others, that’s why I want you to show  what you can support and is in line with the possibilities you have on your blog. 

See if you can make one blog part of it or cut it into pieces. That’s up to you. I transfer the pictures with WE TRANSFER to you, as it is right you got a mail with the link to download the pictures.

It looks like the pictures that it is all clean and tidy maybe but appearances are deceptive, most of the time it’s not so tidy for me either, for the pictures I cleaned it up.

I have tried to be as complete as possible but if there are any questions please let me know.

I built the barn myself, so as the floor plan was drawn. First I built room 1 which is completely isolated and where I can work during the winter, there are also the most expensive machines. 

Later on I built room 2, to store also the wood for the stove. Finally, 5 years ago I built room 3, the largest room where also other things are stored as only hobby stuff, also our bikes and everthing els.

Room 1 is the room where I stay most in, coarse work I do room 2, such as sawing, sanding and coarse drilling.  In room 3 I mainly do business that need some space, the large, homemade workbench is a good tool for that. And as you can see, I can’t throw anything away and I keep everything I think of that can be useful in the next hundred years.

The photos contain references to the machine and the space where they are located.

I hope you like the total information.

Kindest regards

Huib

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The thing about Holland, is that they HAVE to make the world’s best pumps.  Otherwise they are under water.  Much of the country is below sea level.

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Now, that is nice!

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Ahhh!

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Ahhhhhh!

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Nice!  But I will stick with CNC.

Huib also sent a video of his steam plant.  Unfortunately I do not have the space to post it, but if Huib can remember the YouTube address I will include that later.

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Storage is always a problem no?

So, thank you Huib, for sharing your workplace with us.  It is very interesting to see how other model engineers work, and their equipment.  I have posted only a fraction of Huib’s photos, due to space limitations.    I hope that the chosen shots are of interest to my readers.

ps.  Huib, I found the YouTube video…Very nice work!

 

Another John’s Workshop.

Now this is a workshop where I would feel at home…..

“Hi John some photo’s attached.

I work in my double garage 56 square meters. I have been self employed for the last 30 years but have reached the stage where I want to retire, some of my customers still send me jobs to do which I cannot say no to so it keeps the hobby going.
I have a Bridgeport copy converted to 4 axis CNC running Mach3 using MachStdMill screen set (love it).
My lathe is a Prototrak SLX on a King Rich lathe bed ( toolroom quality).
Misc other machines small surface grinder,tool & cutter grinder, compressor, 15 tonne press, bandsaw,welding gear electric & oxy acetylene, overhead crane ( 250kg capacity )
I am running out of space.
I am close to finishing my boiler will send some photo’s soon.
Cheers
John”
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Thanks for the pics John.  A bit of gear envy happening here.  Love the gantry!

Workshop Photos. Are all Modellers Obsessive -Compulsive Neat Freaks?

I am starting to regret asking for the workshop photos.  Another reader, John, has sent in photos of his super organised, super clean workshop.  We must admit that it looks quite inviting,….

and fairly safe, unlike my disorganised dirty mess.

Here are the photos.   Somewhere in Oz.

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And some notes from John….

“Thought you and possibly your readers might enjoy some pics of my ‘shop. All crammed into a two car garage! I really am running out of space and have to try and be as efficient as possible in that regard . Note the ladders etc hung on brackets from the ceiling in one of the pics. I also have an anvil and coke forge outside, plus materials, bolts and the like stored in one of the garden sheds outside the workshop.

A few notes to go:

103350 my ML7 Myford lathe lives behind the large red tool chest which is handily placed to mill and lathes. Parts washer (green lid) to right of pic, under cloth foreground is completed riding trailer to go behind current long term project 2 ½ “ Burrell traction engine. In welding area, BOC Industrial MIG, Unimig plasma cutter sitting on top, orange cabinet is sand blaster. Note also the copper pipes across the ceiling – they run across and back to help cool the air and dehumidify, with droppers and drain cocks at various locations, plus there’s two inline filters (one to 3 micron) to help ensure dry air for spray painting and sand blasting.

103407 ac/dcTIG, folder/g’tine/rolls (blue in corner), new welding/fab bench frames under construction on floor by current welding bench.

103450 press, tool and cutter grinder, bandsaw, oxy, compressor.

103575 mill, drill press and two grinders/linisher.

103558 ML7 – my first lathe

103633 bench area, tall grey cabinet holds lots of gear – taps, dies, tooling, roatab, dividing head etc etc

104041 recent mods to compressor to quieten the beast using an old Holden red motor air cleaner. Replaces the small plastic jobbies that screw into the heads. It’s been quite effective.”

So, thank you John, for further magnifying my inferiority complex regarding workshop organisation.  And I know that these machines are put to work, making a traction engine, and currently a beam engine.  Plus a full time job, unlike this retired medico who has time to kill.

Dear readers, if anyone has a dirty, disorganised, dark workshop, please send me some photos.  It will do wonders for my self esteem.

 

 

Southworth Steam/Water Pump

I am progressing my Southworth pump.   Today, Stuart brought his completed version, so I photographed the incomplete and complete versions together.   Actually, it was very useful to see Stuart’s pump again.  An obvious difference in one of the components made me realise that I had made a mistake.   Now rectified.

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My incomplete version and the working version.

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Stuart’s working version.

Three more workshops. Why are they all so neat? Or am I just very messy?

Reader Tim from NSW, Oz, sent these pics

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Optimum mill, Chicago compressor “very quiet”,  Myford Super 7 lathe, drill press.

 

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Optimum 6″lathe, drop band saw, linisher.   Plenty of light.  No swarf on the floor (no snakes apparently).

And from Victoria Oz,  Neil sent these shots of his workshop, with some work in progress visible…

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Reading Neil’s signs reminds me of a sign which I saw on someone else’s mill or lathe… “Not to be operated by fuckwits”.   Maybe I should put up such a sign on in my workshop, but then, it might invite comments about the current occupant.

And finally, my friend and mentor Stuart’s workshop…

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This is Stuart’s kitchen, which he is putting to the best use!   Note the laser cutter, which will cut metal up to 1mm thick, and the optical comparator.   But does the laser slice the toast, Stuart?

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Stuart’s actual workshop is the garage.  The car, very sensibly has been expelled to the outside.  Note the Boxford CNC lathe (the same as my Boxford CNC lathe), and the old green manual lathe on the back wall, still gets a lot of use.  Disgustingly neat and clean.   Starting to get a complex about this.

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And in the other direction is Stuart’s CNC mill (blue base), CNC router on the bench.

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And finally, I decided to add a shot of the spare bedroom in my home.  Note the Boxford CNC lathe,

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This is the spare bedroom in my house.  You are welcome to stay, after moving some stuff.

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My Boxford CNC lathe in the spare bedroom.  Well, no-one comes to stay very often!

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Another view of the spare bedroom.  2 Boley jeweller’s lathes.  They do occasionally get used.

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And another view of the spare bedroom.  Plenty of bedtime reading.  And another jeweller’s lathe in case you get the urge in the middle of the night.

So there you are.   Please send your photos of your heaven on Earth.

 

 

TWO WORKSHOPS

This post was inspired by one of my readers sending me some photos of her workshop.  The photos grabbed my attention for several reasons.

Firstly, the metal working machines share the space with tomatoes!  Unusual, eclectic use of the space.  Secondly, the roof and walls are made of glass!   Great for natural lighting, and nice views for the machinist, and possibly the neighbours.  Thirdly, it is such a small space, requiring planning to accomodate quite a few machines and work space.   And fourthly, it is so neat and clean.  I do see an occasional bit of swarf, but it is so unlike the mess that I work in, that it is quite striking to see such a clean workshop.

Thanks to reader Jennifer for sending these photos.  For obvious reasons I will not publish further location details except to reveal that the location is in the UK.

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Jennifer tells me that it is all double glazed, and is open to the living area of the house, so it is heated.  Apparently it never becomes too hot in summer.

And as a complete antithesis, this is my main workshop in Oz.  Bigger, messier, dirtier, darker.    Actually, when I looked over my photos I could not find one decent view of my workshop, so I took some new pics.  Needless to say, there was no special tidying for the photo.

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It is a tin shed, unlined, but does have a wood heater.  This view takes in about 2/3 of the area.  There are 3 lathes in this shot.  Can you see them?  CNC lathe in foreground.  Also my CNC mill on the right.  There is also a tool and cutter grinder, vertical bandsaw, drop bandsaw.  And lots of ancillary tooling.

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And a pedestal drill, 2 linishers, grinder, and part view of the drop band saw.  The anvil gets quite a lot of use.  It is mounted on heavy duty wheels so I can take it to the job.

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My workbench in the foreground, A very heavy cast iron setup table (blue) with granite surface plate.  Shop made ring roller centre.

So, that is where I spend most of my waking hours.  The shed started life as a farm workshop, where a lot of welding, and repair and maintenance of farm machinery was done.   These days it is mainly used for model engineering.  In my working life I was an obsessively neat, organised and particular surgeon.  Not quite sure how my activities ended in this mess.  But you know what?… I feel totally comfortable here.

 

 

If you have some photos of your own workshop area, please send them in and I will publish them for the interest of other readers.  Big areas, small areas, old machines or new.  Show us where you spend your most enjoyable hours.   Send them to me at jviggers@iinet.net.au

 

 

 

 

Steam Powered Water Feed Pump

My CNC mill is now mostly functioning, although several functions are yet to be connected.  The main spindle and XY&Z axes are working, and responding appropriately to Mach3 commands from the laptop computer.  It has taken longer than anticipated so far, mainly due to difficulty in understanding manuals supplied from Asia.   Axis limit and homing switches, oil pump, coolant pump, work light, and cooling fans still to be connected.

So there has been little of general interest coming out of my workshop.  Hence no posts on this site.  Not that I have been idle.

I disassembled the top slide on the Colchester lathe to discover the cause for excessive back-lash.  It was a worn acme thread bronze nut.   No luck yet in finding a new nut for this 45 year old lathe.   I will have to make one.  Meanwhile, I used a quick and dirty trick to reduce the back-lash which I will detail soon.

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The top-slide acme screw and bronze nut which needs replacing.

I also cleaned and freed up a 3 jaw 10″ chuck which I bought on Ebay.  It was frozen solid, so I soaked it in kerosene bath for a few months.  Actually, I forgot all about it while it was in the kerosene, and accidentally rediscovered it.   This time, after using an impact screwdriver, I was able to open it up and expose the gears and get them moving.  Might be worth a photo also.

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The 240mm diameter chuck.  I was tempted to buy by the removable, reversible  jaws.  Thinking that I could make some soft jaws.   Trouble is that it is an industrial production line chuck with very little movement.   But it is nice and tight.  Still deciding.  At least I can wind the jaws in and out a bit now.

And I finally got around to installing piston rings in the triple expansion steam engine.  Used Viton O-rings.  Not a difficult task, and it should not be difficult to replace them from time to time in future.   Will be interesting to see if the engine performance improves.

Now to get onto my next project.  I have plans and bronze castings for a Southworth design water pump, for replenishing the vertical boiler water while it is in use.  It was a surprise to me, just how much water is consumed by a boiler which is powering a model steam engine.  To date I have used a hand pump, but having seen a steam powered pump in action, I have decided to make one.

The steam is supplied from the boiler which is being replenished.  The pump has to use steam at boiler steam pressure, to force water into the boiler.  So the pump has to raise the pressure of the feed water above the pressure of the steam which is powering the pump.   The clever pump design uses large steam driven pistons to drive smaller water pump pistons.

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Larger steam pistons top right 5/8″ dia,  water pistons bottom left 3/8″ dia.

Here is a video of a Southworth pump in action.  It was made by Stuart Tankard.  Here it is running on compressed air, but I have seen it working similarly on steam.  I will be making one of the same design, hopefully approaching this level of finish.

 

 

A build of larger version of the pump was described by J. Bertinat in  a series of articles “Model Engineer” in 1993 (first article 18 June 1993).

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The unmachined castings.  Lumps of rough bronze.   And the plans.

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One of the castings after preliminary machining to establish some faces.  The “water cylinders” block.   Part no. 6

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Good quality castings.

 

 

CNC Mill Upgrade -8

Fitted the new VSD Friday.  Ordered Tues pm.  Arrived Thurs am.  Impressive.

$AUD315, inc shipping.   Job cost is mounting.  Still within reasonable limits.

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The old VSD, top right.  The axis controllers (top left) had not been wired when this photo was taken.

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The new VSD (variable speed drive) 4kw.  Fitted neatly with some new mounting holes, without any drama.  The rats nest looks less daunting every day.

Now, except for the main spindle motor, there are no more original major electrical components.  All have been updated and replaced, along with the cables.

Yet to be wired are the VSD, coolant pump, oil feed pump, limit switches, homing switches, and the Gecko driver and 48v power supply for the rotary table.   But the mill is useable now.   Video coming up soon.

 

CNC Mill Upgrade – 7.

2 steps forward, 1 step back.   That’s what this project is experiencing.

The axis servo motors, their controllers and connections to power, breakout boards, and computer connections are complete, and all working.

An old laptop has found a use.  Installed Mach3, Vectric V-Carve Pro.   And the connections to the Smooth Stepper board.  Windows 10.   Deleted all non CNC related programs to gain space on the hard drive.

A problem with the main spindle.  It is essentially unchanged from the original.  Same motor (4kw/5hp 3 phase), same VSD, and same 3 phase power which is supplied through a phase changer, because the property has only 2 phases supplied.  When powered up, it worked, but the RPM’s could not be altered from a very slow rate.  The controlling voltage from the breakout board was not changing despite changing the inputs.  ? due to a problem with the settings, or a faulty BOB.  Didn’t seem serious.

So I was a bit surprised when later I switched on the mill, intending to change some settings, to hear 2 significant pops, and to smell that disgusting burnt electrical component smell, with smoke coming from the electrical enclosure.

Quickly shut everything down, and waited for the cavalry to arrive.

Stuart found that a 24v power supply had failed.  No big deal.  Not an expensive component.  Maybe got a short circuit from a bit of swarf?   But further inspection revealed that the VSD had also failed.  A capacitor and diode burnt out.  ? caused by a surge from the failing power supply? Repairable, but I decided to buy a new VSD.  The failed VSD is probably as old as the mill (24 years), so it had a pretty good run.  If the old VSD is repairable, it will serve as a spare.

Meanwhile, as a consequence, the main spindle is not working.  I have a list of jobs that I want to get into, particularly the steam pump for the vertical boiler.   So I will reattach the high speed spindle and use that.  It is 2.2kw, but uses high revs to develop power, so I will be limited to small end mills and drills, until the new components (VSD and power supply) arrive.  The high speed spindle is single phase, and the speed control is manually selected.   Not quite as convenient but useable for the time being.

While Stuart has his head buried in the electrical enclosure, I have been his gopher and TA.  But also fitting in a couple of other jobs which have been on the “to do” list for ages.  Like clearing out rubbish from the workshop, tidying up etc.

One task which has been vexing me, was to remove a sheet of flooring board which was under the Colchester lathe.  The sheet was originally placed under the lathe to protect the vinyl floor covering, but it was not a good decision.  As the flooring board became wet with cutting oil and coolant, it would swell and shrink, and I was aware that the lathe levels and settings were changing.  So I decided to remove the sheet of flooring, and let the lathe feet sit directly on steel pads on the vinyl/concrete floor.

But how to remove the sheet of flooring from underneath the almost 1 ton lathe?  The lathe was originally placed into its rather tight position with a forklift, which is no longer available.  The wooden sheet was the same size as the base of the lathe.

So I made these…

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The bolt adjusts the height of the jack.

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From a piece of scrap I-beam.

I used a crow bar to raise the corners of the lathe enough to place the jacks into position.  A bit of trial and error to get the heights correct.    When the lathe was about 25mm clear of the flooring, I pulled the sheet out.  Then used the crowbar to remove the jacks, and lower the lathe onto its base plates.

I will reset the lathe’s screw feet in the next day or 2, using a precision level and test cuts.  There was an excellent YouTube video by “This Old Tony” on the subject recently.

 

CNC Mill Upgrade – 6. Where to put the computer?

Not much more to report today, but I have decided how to position the computer.

Not easy, because the computer needs to be protected from flying swarf and coolant spray from the CNC mill and the manual mill which is immediately adjacent.    And I want the computer to be close to the machine.  The CNC mill is NOT in an enclosure.

So this is what I have decided….

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The laptop is just low enough to reach while standing.   The E stop and other buttons are underneath.

And if the swarf is really flying, I can turn the PC away…

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Might need some adjustments.  The laptop is an old Dell ATG.   Said to be resistant to fluids and relatively resistant to shock/vibration etc.   Military specs.   I might add some side protection and perhaps a roof.

 

 

CNC Mill Upgrade -5

I have been putting quite a few hours into the upgrade, but not much to show photographically.

Finally got the new servo motors installed.  Replaced the X axis belt.  The most difficult servo to access was the Y axis, and of course that was the only one where the alignment of the timing belt was out.   Finally sorted by using a fibre optic camera to see why the belt was climbing onto the flange of the pulley.  The pulley was 1.2mm too far onto its shaft.  I know that, because I solved the problem by inserting washers under the motor mounts.  1mm washers did not work, nor did 1.5mm washers.  But 1.2mm washes did work perfectly.

Today Stuart arrived and removed more of the old wiring.

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Stuart, doing another CNC upgrade wiring.

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The old 7k computer has been removed, leaving some buttons.  I might be able to use those. The computer enclosure might disappear too.  Not decided yet.

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The old CNC mill has lost some weight.  Those cartons are full of old parts.  Note that the floor has been swept.  Stuart was concerned that we might be infested with snakes, but it is winter here, so we should OK until the weather warms up.

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The rats nest is disappearing.

CNC Mill Upgrade -4

I removed the old XY & Z axis servo motors from the mill.  Each one weighs about 15kg (33lb).

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The old servo motors.  The X and Z were working fine.  The Y was faulty, but I do not know whether the fault was in the motor, the encoder, the controller, or the connecting wires.  I will put them on Ebay as 2 working, one for parts.

Then I removed the belt drive pulley off each motor.  There was a grub screw, which would not budge.  Assuming that it had been Loctited, I applied some heat, judiciously.  The grub screw came out, but the pulley would not budge, so a little more heat, and a gear puller.   Two of the gears came off, but one still would not budge.

I asked for advice, and I was loaned a different type of gear puller. (thanks Rudi).  This time, some movement of the gear on the shaft was noted, and eventually the last motor gave up its gear.

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This one worked.

The shaft of the old motors was 16mm diameter.  The new motors had 19mm shafts.  So I spent some time on the lathe boring out the gears to fit the shafts of the new motors.  The keyways of the old motors were 5x5mm, and the new ones were 6x6mm.  So, I borrowed a 6mm broach (thanks Stuart), and enlarged the keyways in the rebored gears to 6mm width.   The new keyways needed a lower profile, so some time on the mill and surface grinder  to reduce the thickness of the keys to 4.5mm.

That was quite a few peasant hours hours on the lathe, mill, and surface grinder, but the end result was good.

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The new servo motors, with the timing belt gears fitted, with keys in place.  I will set each motor in place on the CNC mill, determine the final exact position of the gear on the shaft, then indent the shaft for the grub screw.  Then, when I am sure that all is correct, the gear, grubscrew and shaft will be Loctited.

Another small issue was that the boss on the new motors was 5mm deep compared to 3.5mm deep for the originals.  So the mounting plate for each motor needed the recess to be deepened by about 1.5mm.

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I used a boring head on the mill to deepen the first one, but it did not produce a good finish, so the next 2 (shown) were deepened on the lathe, in a 4 jaw chuck.

Meanwhile, back to the rats nest in the electric control enclosure….

 

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The bare space top left is where the old servo controllers lived.  They were removed.  Then I spent a half day tracing each wire from the controller to the old servo, and removing it.  That produced a carton full of wires.  The rats nest is now a little less tangled.  A lot more of those wires will be removed as the job progresses.

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The new servo controllers bolted into position.  They are fatter than the originals, so a bit of rearranging was required.  The yellow box top right is the main spindle speed control (VSD) which is being retained.

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And on the right hand side, newly bolted into position today, from the top down, are the smooth stepper, the C11 breakout board, and two C10 breakout boards.   Awaiting some expert wiring.  (Stuart, are you reading this?)

 

Upgrading the CNC mill -3. Moving a threaded hole in steel plate.

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this is the new Y axis servo motor, sitting on its mounting plate, after the old servo has been removed

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Unfortunately the existing M8 threaded holes in the mounting plate are just in the wrong position for the new motor’s 8mm mounting holes.

So, do I 1. make a new mounting plate and assembly?   2. machine or file the new motor’s holes to fit the old plate?   Or 3. Fill the old mounting plate hole, then drill and tap new holes in the correct position  ??

  1.  seemed a lot of work   2. would have looked ugly and probably voided the motor’s warranty      3.  Seemed tricky, but I decided to give it a go.   If unsuccessful I could always revert to 1.

Filling the old holes.  Could have used steel thread and silver soldered it into place.  In retrospect, would probably have been the best option.   Could have used steel thread and Loctited it into place…. decided against, in case subsequent machining  softened the Loctite.   Could have filled the old holes with bronze, and drilled and tapped new threaded holes….   well, for better or worse, that’s what I decided to do.

The new holes impinged about 25-33% on the old holes.

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The old holes were bronzed.   I improved my technique as I moved around the holes.

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After cleaning up on the mill, the new holes were center drilled 

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Then drilled to size, and tapped.  revealed that the bronze did not entirely fill the voids. 

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I wondered if the bronze would accept a suitable degree of tightening of the M8 cap screws, but all seemed fine.   Note the jacking bolts, to prevent distortion of the weldment in the milling vice.

The bronze-steel sandwich did cause the tapping drill to wander slightly, but not enough to cause concern.  Next time I will try silver soldering in a steel filler piece.

Meanwhile, I have been removing parts and wires from the electrical enclosure.

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The servo controllers are removed.  Bit of a rats’ nest hey!  About 90% to go…

 

Installing the lathe gear

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I neglected to take a photo of the completed gear.  In this shot it is almost finished.

I intended to reassemble the spindle and its cluster of gears, spacers, and taper roller bearings myself, but after talking to an expert on the topic (Swen Pettig), I realised that sometimes it is better to leave surgery to a surgeon.

I gratefully accepted Swen’s offer to help.  In his working  life Swen had performed this task on many, many occasions.

Firstly Swen reinserted the taper bearing outer races in the headstock.  The lathe spindle is approx 80mm diameter and 800mm long so it is heavy.  After carefully cleaning, it was fed into the headstock, progressively loading the bearings, gears, spacers, clips and nuts, and moving and tapping them down the shaft as it was moved into place.

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Note the photo prints to remind us of the order of reassembly.  Board to protect the lathe bed.  Repaired gear laying flat.  Surgeons’ towels blue rags.

when it was all reassembled and tightened, the retaining disk at the chuck end was loosened, sealed with liquid gasket (Loctite product- cannot remember the name), and retightened.

Then Swen went through a lengthy process of checking the end play, using a dial indicator, tapping each end of the shaft with a copper hammer, and finally settling on 0.01mm of play.

Then we had a short test run at low speed, and he tested the end play again, with no change.

Then we set it running at 200 rpm, and went and had a cup of coffee for 20 minutes.  Came back and checked the bearings temperatures.   All cold, all good.

I reinstalled the external gears, the cover, etc, and took some decent cuts in some cold rolled bar.

All good.  Oil change soon.

 

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