johnsmachines

machines which I have made, am making, or intend to make, and some other stuff. If you find this site interesting, please leave a comment.

Category: CNC

Bronze Casting -2

When I looked closely at the rifling cutters which I had lasered out of a broken Brobo saw blade, I realised that I had boobooed.  I had measured the thickness of the blade at 2.5mm, which was actually a bit thinner than I wanted, but would have been acceptable. But when I measured the cutters, they were only 2.2mm thick.   Reason?  The saw blade had been hollow ground, and the blade inside the teeth was thinner.   Too thin, I decided.

So after some wailing and teeth gnashing I have ordered some 3mm thick tool steel in the form of planer blades, which I am pretty sure will not be hollow ground, and I will ask the laser cutter to cut me some more blades.  So waiting waiting.

And I am setting up the cannon barrel for rifling.  The CNC rotary table (stepper motor hidden behind) will be bolted to the CNC mill table.  The barrel is held in the jig which is held by the mill quill.  The cutter, (not seen in this photo) will be drawn out of the barrel by the mill X axis, while being rotated in the A axis by the rotary table.   That is the plan anyway.  But still waiting for bits to arrive so I can finish the cutting tool.

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The Armstrong cannon barrel held to the mill quill, and the rifling cutter will be held by the CNC rotary table.

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The rifling tool which I will not be using because the cutter is too narrow.  The cutting edge just peeping out of the slot will be dragged and twisted through the barrel bore.  The cap screw adjusts the degree of protrusion.

 

BRONZE CASTING

Meanwhile, I am accumulating various bits of gear to do some bronze casting.   An electric furnace with graphite crucible from China, Some jewellery investment material for the moulds, and a second hand pottery kiln for preparation of the moulds, and melting out the PLA 3D printed parts.   I will take some photos when it is all here.

And SWMBO has conscripted me to assemble and install some kitchen cupboards for a property which she is renovating.

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These are flat pack units.  Kaboodle.  Well designed and CNC cut and predrilled.  Not quite finished.  Waiting for the stone bench tops to be made and installed, and for appliances to be wired and plumbed.  Frankly I would prefer to be tidying up my workshop, but hopefully I am gaining some “Brownie Points”.

NBN. At Last!

And about the last.  The fibre optic network was commenced about 3 years ago, and I applied for a connection shortly after.

Despite living in the centre of Victoria’s second biggest city, my house was not connected to the National Broadband Network until today.

Until then I have coped with download speeds as low as 1mb/sec, and uploads as slow as 60kb/sec.  Do you wonder why I upload so few videos?

Today, the NBN was finally connected.  The download speed is a blistering 50mb/sec, and uploads 25mb/sec.  Wow!

Just to celebrate, I am posting some pictures.  Not much to report from the workshop, but I am accumulating some items in readiness for rifling the model cannon bore.

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This photograph would typically have taken 60-120 seconds to upload previously.  Today it took about 5 seconds!    As you can see it is a cold saw blade which has seen better days.  My bad, unfortunately.   But I saved the pieces,  because these blades are made of high quality tool steel.  I have had some parts laser cut .

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The laser cutter left the tabs intact so the tiny parts would not be lost.

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The 2.5mm thick part popped out with a bit of finger pressure.  Not much tidying up required here, but I will sharpen the cutting edge.  This will be the cutter for the rifling of the model cannon.

This is the first time I have had parts laser cut, and I am impressed by the accuracy and smoothness of the cut and the narrow kerf (0.2mm).    Oh, and the cost.  It was surprisingly inexpensive.  ($AUD26).

 

3D Printing is SLOW

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Crealty CR-10s 3D printer.  The machinists parallels were my solution to ensuring that the horizontal arm is parallel to the base frame.

So, I took delivery of the 14kg box, and spent a couple of hours assembling the printer.  It was partly assembled, as delivered, and if I had known what I was doing the final assembly would have been done in a fraction of the time.  The assembly instructions were adequate.  The wiring connections were well labelled.  The wiring connectors were delicate, and I took care not to bend or break them.

The vertical frame bolts to the base frame, and it is surprisingly rigid.  There are 2 Z axis stepper motors, and when not powered up, they can be individually turned.  It occurred to me that the horizontal arm which the Z axis motors raise and lower should be exactly parallel to the base, so I placed the machinist’s parallels as shown in the above photo and screwed the horizontal arm down onto the parallels to set the horizontal position.  I assume that the Z steppers will move the arm equally. (Hmm… I will check that assumption later.)

Next day, I downloaded the operating software.  An older version was supplied with the machine, and the newer version would not work on my old XP Pro Windows computer, so I used the old version.

I spent some time manually levelling the bed, then ran the automatic bed levelling software.

The printed operating instructions are very basic.  An Internet connection is assumed, and I did not have one available, so my first printed object was with default settings and the supplied white filament.

Somewhat to my surprise, it worked.

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The platten is aluminium.  A glass plate was also supplied, so I used that on top of the aluminium.

The filename was “dog”.  I had no idea whether “dog” was a 3D dog, a picture, or whatever.  Neither did I have any idea of its size.  After an hour, I had printed a disk about 125mm diameter and 1.1mm thick.  Then the disk came off the platten, so I aborted the print.

Today, after getting some advice from Stuart T regarding print adhesion I removed the glass platten cover and applied some special adhesive 3D printer cover.  It is called “3M double coated tissue tape 9080A”.  Then I printed 2 more items.  Neither broke free.  in fact they were difficult to remove at the conclusion of the prints.

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This tiny Tyranosaurus was printed from a 3D file which I found on my computer.  It printed in about 20 minutes.  Default settings again.  The supports were too big for the object, and when I broke them free I also broke off the T Rex arms.  Some settings for supports need to be changed.

The next print was a tool which I planned for the 3D printer…..

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The item is a speed handle for a milling vise.  It is 80mm diameter with some grippy indentations on the circumference.  The tricky feature to make is the hex hole, to fit a 19mm hex shaft.  This is the 3D drawing, imported into the Creality software, so the G code can be generated.

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First layers.  Each layer is 0.2mm thick

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The internal framework is a bit lighter than I wanted.  I thought that I had chosen 90% density.  (ps.  a couple of weeks later.  The speed handle seems to be standing up to the usual rough treatment in my workshop, despite my misgivings about its lightness.)

 

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The speed handle on the vise.  Nice fit.  The print took over 2 hours.

Not perfect, but too bad at all.

 

30 watt Laser in action.

Not mine, unfortunately.  This one is Stuart Tankard’s.  It is a Ytterbium generated, 30w, fibre laser, and the wavelength is such that the 0.01mm diameter beam will burn holes in metal.  Ytterbium, for those who can’t be bothered to look it up,  is a rare earth metal, atomic number 70,  Stuart has used the laser to cut parts from a 1.2mm thick hacksaw blade.  And in the following video he is making marks in a work-tool rest which I will use on my Radius Master sander grinder.

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It is a 360º protractor, and grid lines at 10mm intervals.   Looks purposeful.  Time will tell if it is useful.

Watch the video.  I am experiencing tool envy.

 

Listening to my own voice is pretty painful.  I hope that it doesn’t grate too much on you.

 

Next Tool Project…A CNC Laser Cutter

The Southworth steam powered boiler feed pump has many gaskets.  I have not counted them, but there must be 15-20.  All with many 2mm and 4mm  holes.

And in the process of making the machine, I have broken quite a few of them with the multiple assemblies and tear downs.

But, fortunately, 2 of the members of my model engineering club have laser CNC cutters, so extra sets of gaskets has not been an impossible ask.  (Thank you Brendan and Stuart!)

So, some time ago I asked Stuart, if it would be possible to attach a laser cutter to the CNC mill.  His initial answer was NO.  But recently, he changed his tune.   He attached a laser head to his 3D printed CNC mill and started producing gaskets on request!   So, as is a recent pattern, I am walking in Stuart’s footsteps, and I have purchased a 15 watt laser head on Ebay.   Chinese of course.

Laser kit 15w

This is the kit.   Cost $AuD146.

Laser head

And this is the 15w laser head.  Now I have to work out how to attach it to my mill.  Shouldn’t be too difficult, as long as I don’t turn on the spindle while it is attached.

 

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My CNC mill, during the electronics upgrade.  Most recent photo.   Soon to have a laser head.

Stuart assures me that Mach3 can be configured to operate the laser….   turn it on and off, move the axes at an appropriate speed, etc.  I think that some trickery is involved.

And future gaskets will be as simple as ….

So watch this space .

CNC Mill Upgrade -8

Fitted the new VSD Friday.  Ordered Tues pm.  Arrived Thurs am.  Impressive.

$AUD315, inc shipping.   Job cost is mounting.  Still within reasonable limits.

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The old VSD, top right.  The axis controllers (top left) had not been wired when this photo was taken.

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The new VSD (variable speed drive) 4kw.  Fitted neatly with some new mounting holes, without any drama.  The rats nest looks less daunting every day.

Now, except for the main spindle motor, there are no more original major electrical components.  All have been updated and replaced, along with the cables.

Yet to be wired are the VSD, coolant pump, oil feed pump, limit switches, homing switches, and the Gecko driver and 48v power supply for the rotary table.   But the mill is useable now.   Video coming up soon.

 

CNC Mill Upgrade -5

I have been putting quite a few hours into the upgrade, but not much to show photographically.

Finally got the new servo motors installed.  Replaced the X axis belt.  The most difficult servo to access was the Y axis, and of course that was the only one where the alignment of the timing belt was out.   Finally sorted by using a fibre optic camera to see why the belt was climbing onto the flange of the pulley.  The pulley was 1.2mm too far onto its shaft.  I know that, because I solved the problem by inserting washers under the motor mounts.  1mm washers did not work, nor did 1.5mm washers.  But 1.2mm washes did work perfectly.

Today Stuart arrived and removed more of the old wiring.

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Stuart, doing another CNC upgrade wiring.

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The old 7k computer has been removed, leaving some buttons.  I might be able to use those. The computer enclosure might disappear too.  Not decided yet.

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The old CNC mill has lost some weight.  Those cartons are full of old parts.  Note that the floor has been swept.  Stuart was concerned that we might be infested with snakes, but it is winter here, so we should OK until the weather warms up.

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The rats nest is disappearing.

CNC Mill Upgrade -2

The major components arrived this week, from China and USA.  Switches, and other components which go “ping” will be bought locally as required.  I am hoping that existing pulleys, belts, brackets will be adaptable.

The motors to drive the X, Y and Z axes are 1.2kW AC servo motors which can be connected to single or 3 phase power.  Each one weighs 6.7kg (14.7lb) .  From China, they are nicely finished.   Substantially shorter than the old servos which they are replacing and slightly larger diameter.  I am hoping that the slightly larger diameter will not cause major problems.

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AC servo.  There are 3 of these.  Kitchen knife to open the box and for scale.

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Old Y axis servo on the right, and the new AC servo left.

 

And each servo motor came with a controller and cables and connectors.

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And the electronics came from USA.

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C11 breakout board.

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C10 breakout boards x2

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And the Smooth stepper control board.  It is tiny, but the most expensive electronic component.

All up cost so far is ~$AUD2100, of which shipping is about 25%.

Next step is to swap over the servos.  The old shafts are 16mm and the new ones are 19mm.  I intend to machine the bores of the pulleys.  Hope there is enough meat  Tofu to allow that.

Cutting the Gear

Today Swen and I started cutting the gear.  Here is the setup.

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The gear was centered on the rotary table with an aluminium bush, which fitted the outside of an ER40 collet chuck.  The chuck had an M3 shaft which fitted neatly into the spindle of the rotary table.  3 bolts secured the gear blank to the T slots on the rotary table.

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This photo was taken after the setup was broken down.  Showing the M3 taper ER 40 collet holder, which I used to centralise the gear blank on the rotary table.

I started the mill conservatively at 200 rpm and a 0.5mm deep cut, but gradually increased the RPM to 450, and the depth of cut to 2mm.   Later adjusted to 300rpm, 1mm cut.

The CNC table performed flawlessly, with rapid advances between the 360/77º degree cuts (about 4.6º each tooth).  The feed rate was controlled by manually winding the X axis feed on the mill.

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We initially used water soluble cutting fluid, but changed later to raw Tap Magic, which seemed to work better.

As you can hear in the following short video, the cutter teeth are slightly off centre, but working well.  Didn’t quite finish the gear teeth in this session.  Some sparks later on, indicated that a cutter sharpening was required before the finishing run.  That will happen tomorrow.

The smoke is evaporation of cutting oil.

The setup will be left undisturbed by removing the gear cutter for sharpening.

I changed my mind about sharpening the cutter in the middle of the job, and continued cutting.

Instead, I lowered the spindle rpm, and the feed-rate.  The sparks stopped.  Maybe I was just pushing too hard, or maybe there was a hard spot in the metal.  Anyway, I finished the cuts.

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The finished gear cut.  Are those teeth looking a bit skinny at the peaks?

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Showing the setup from the operator’s view.  The CNC table worked brilliantly.

 

 

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Removing the burrs with wire brush and file.

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And testing the fit with a trial run in the headstock.  Thanks Swen, for helping (actually directing) the trial run.  The new gear on the left.

I made a video of the gear being rotated through 360mm, perfectly, but for some reason it will not upload.  (did upload eventually.. see below).    It looks perfect, with a tiny amount of backlash.   Full installation in a day or two.  I was quite surprised that making the gear to the specifications worked so well.

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Me, testing the backlash.

And afterwards, sharpening the cutter on the Quorn T&C cutter grinder which I made a few years ago.  An amazingly versatile tool.

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Just in case I need to make another.

The lathe headstock will be properly reassembled in a couple of days.  But I am finally feeling a bit confident about this job.

 

 

 

New Spindle Motor for the Boxford 125TCL CNC lathe.

Reader Ben asked about the spindle motor replacement on the Boxford.   This is a small CNC lathe, and was often used for teaching in secondary schools in Australia.  Mine was made in 1985, and I replaced the electronics a few years back because they were obsolete and not functioning.  The mechanicals of the lathe were beautifully made and in excellent condition.  I did replace the ball screws, but in retrospect, that was probably unnecessary.   I also installed new and bigger axis stepper motors.

I was still getting some unreliable results, despite the the upgrades, and wondered whether the spindle motor was lacking power.  I was taking lighter cuts to try and cope but clearly a new spindle motor was required.

The space that the motor occupies is fairly tight, and initial searches for a suitable replacement were fruitless.  The new  ClearPath motors looked promising, but enquiries to the manufacturer indicated that the required power and rpm’s were not available.  Then my expert friend (or should that be “friend who is an expert”?), spotted the Ebay ad below, and bought and succesfully installed the servo motor in his 125TCL, so I did likewise.  I am afraid that the electronic aspects remain a mystery to me, so I cannot help with those.  It is a 0.75kW motor, substantially more powerful than the original, but very compact.

 

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Do an Ebay search on the code on the controller.  I paid $AUD339 but it is now plus postage and GST, so close to $AUD400

 

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The new spindle motor and servo controller

 

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A new motor pulley was required.  There is still a high and low belt ratio available, but with the extra power and torque I never use the low ratio.  RPM range is 300-3200.

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This has been a very successful modification.

Many thanks to Stuart Tankard for his generosity in time, expertise and advice in getting it going.

 

 

 

 

Project in the Wings.

While finishing the triple expansion steam engine, I have decided on my next project.  Actually, based on my past history of procrastination with the triple, I might even put aside the triple to start on this one.

Reading this article in “Model Engineers’ Workshop” gave me the inspiration to convert a rotary table to electronic control.

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Dec 2016 MEW article

So I have commenced accumulating the bits and pieces…

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An 8″ Vertex rotary table.  I have had this for years, but unused since acquiring a universal dividing head.  Should be ideal for this project.

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A Nema 24 Stepper motor, shafts at each end, so I can use the table manually as well as electronically.  The Microstep driver was supplied packaged with the motor as a kit.  $90AUD inc postage.

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From the same supplier, a 48volt power supply.  $38AUD

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The brain of the system.  A programable microcontroller “Arduino Uno”.  I bought 5 of these for $20AUD post included.

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And an easily attachable display.  To attach the Arduino.  $19AUD

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And since I knew nothing about Arduinos, a “Getting Started” book.  Excellent.  On loan from a friend (thanks Stuart)

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And to practice some circuits and get some idea about the Arduino programming, a starter kit of bits and pieces.    $75AUD, but has been very instructive and loads of fun.   The program to run the Arduino is downloadable free from the Internet, so this kit might be a bit superfluous.

And some items of kit.  Each under $20AUD.

magnifiers

A magnifier soldering station, and head light and magnifier

multimeter

A very cheap multimeter.  Previous purchase.  Works fine.  $10AUD

I have disassembled the rotary table, and ordered a 12/8mm coupler.  I am waiting for the coupler before I start designing and cutting the main part to be fabricated which is the piece which joins the stepper and the table.

Also ordered a box to contain the electronics and switches.  Havn’t yet thought about cables,  joiners etc.

 

 

 

Model Ottoman Bombard – Painting

I would have preferred that the title of this blog was “Finishing the Ottoman Bombard”, but I am still waiting for the vectors of the barrel mouth decorations and Arabic (?) writing, and the touch hole.

But I have at least painted the bombard, and the pictures follow.  You will notice that I have not attempted to reproduce the bronze or copper colours of the orginal in Fort Nelson.  Partly because I doubted my ability to make painting such variegated patterns realistic, and partly because the cannon would not have looked like that in its heyday of 1464.  It would probably have been either black, like most SBML cannons (smooth bore muzzle loading), or possibly gaudy golds and reds and blues like other medieval items.  So I painted it black.  I like it.  If I get evidence that it should be more colourful I can change it later.

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First coat – Primer.  Hmmm… interesting colour.

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Next coat – matt black brushed on, to fill the hairline wood cracks.  Incidentally, the (dirty) parquetry floor is also made from the red gum house stumps from which the cannon is made.

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final two coats –  matt black, from a spray can. 

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So there it is, finished except for the barrel mouth engraving, and the touch hole.  Now what to do with it…   SWMBO says it might be useful as an umbrella stand.

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The breech.  25mm diameter explosion chamber.  1:10 scale

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The barrel, 63mm bore.

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Assembled.  The model is 520mm long.

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It does need some decoration

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A Matter of Scale

Before I get onto a brief reflection about scale, the photo below shows 2 cannon barrels.

The big one was what impelled me to converting a manual lathe into a CNC lathe.  That time consuming, costly, and ultimately very satisfying project, started because the CNC lathe which I used to turn the big barrel could only handle the job by doing it in two stages…. doing the breech first then the muzzle.  That was due to the big barrel being too long for the lathe, at 300mm (12″).

The small barrel was a test for the CNC converted lathe just finished, being the first complicated shape which I have made.   To save on material, I made it at exactly half the scale of the big one, ie 150mm long (6″).

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Comparing the two barrels reminded me, that if an object is twice as big as another, in all 3 dimensions (height, width, depth), it is 8 times as heavy.   And any projectile, and weight of black powder, would also be 8 times the weight.  But the wall thickness of the explosion chamber is only TWICE as thick.

My point is, that if scale is maintained, the smaller the cannon, steam engine, boiler, whatever…..  the less likely it is to explode.

Not that these cannons will ever be fired.  Just hypothetically.

CNC Lathe Conversion – 17

First Test Run

After some test runs without tool or material, I performed some measurements.

500mm movements along the Z axis were reproduced multiple times with a deviation of 0.00mm!  (the Z axis has a ground ball screw)

100mm movements along the X axis deviated 0.02mm.  (the X axis has a rolled ball screw).

I was delighted to note that the lathe is extremely quiet and smooth.  The only noise is some belt slap from the very old belts, and from the stepper motors.

The video below was taken from my iphone, while I was operating the lathe controls, so please excuse the erratic movements.

The steel is 27mm diameter.  750rpm, 50mm/min feeds.

And the guards will be made next step, without fail.

The G code was generated using Mach3 for these very simple shapes.  For more complex items I use Ezilathe.

 

The lathe is 600mm between centres.  38mm spindle bore.  Swing about 300mm.

CNC lathe conversion -15

Another couple of advances in the conversion.  Today I installed the lead screw cover and the cable protector to the cross slide stepper motor.

The cable protector was easy and straightforward. It flexes in one direction only, and is fixed at the ends after the cable is threaded through it.  The length is adjusted by adding or removing links.  It was placed so that coolant liquid will drain out of it, and to minimise the accumulation of swarf.   The cables themselves have a thick covering and are well protected.  The link protector will not kink, further protecting the cable.

It was cheap.  About $AUD20 for 2 meters, posted from China.  I used about 1.1m.

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Showing the stepper motor cable protector, and the lead screw protector (one half of it.  The other half is on the other side of the carriage.)

The lead screw protector was another story.  It is a spring steel coil, about 50mm wide, and as it is compressed the coils fit inside each other.  I made a big mistake in allowing it to spring open before I had installed it (there were no instructions).  It immediately opened to a length of over a meter, in coils about 50-60mm diameter.   No big deal, I thought.  I will just compress it back to its original configuration.    Big mistake.

It was what I imagine coiling a live, oily, biting, boa constrictor would be like.  (OK, boas constrict rather than bite.  How about an anaconda, or a big eel.)

I fought it for about an hour.  And eventually succeeded.  Minus a few bits of my skin.

So I did not allow the protectors to expand again until after I had them on the lead screw.

This is what they look like.   Pretty cool IMO.  They just expanded into position when I removed the restraining clips.

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The lead screw stepper motor and protector.  The Estop box above will get some ends to exclude swarf.

It was not cheap.  The best price that I could find was from South Korea.  $AUD200 inc postage.  But it is excellent Japanese quality.

The wiring is happening, but the variable speed drive seems to be dead.  It has been sitting unused on a shelf for 2 years, so no point asking about warranty.  Took it apart to check for broken wires, fuses, burnt out components etc, but nothing visible.  Will order another one.  About $AUD200.  An unexpected expense.

 

CNC lathe conversion -14

These lathe CNC conversion posts are probably becoming a bit tiresome, but just in case there is someone out there who is interested, I will continue until the job is finished.

The latest was to make and install a spindle speed (and position – thanks David M) sensor.  It consists of a disk with a slot cut in the periphery, attached to the main spindle.  And an opto-electronic sensor which is connected to its own electronic board, thence to the breakout board and VSD.

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The disc with the slot at 8:30 and the sensor at 9:00.  I must have chosen the wrong cutter or turning speed for that disc aluminium…  looks a bit rough.  (note added 13/7    Stuart T says that I should have used coolant-lubricant).

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View from above.  Any clearer?   That gear is now superfluous except as a spacer.

So there is one electronic impulse per spindle revolution.  That is enough to measure the RPM’s.   Essential for cutting threads.

The beauty of this system is that there is no gear selection or changing, and ANY thread pitch can be selected…  metric, imperial, BA  etc…  any odd ball thread that your heart desires.

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The HTD (high torque drive, I am informed by many readers) pulleys and belts and taper lock fittings.  Unfortunately I could not find a taper lock to fit the small pulleys, so when it is all finally, definitely, absolutely, correctly,  positioned, I will Loctite them in position.  Protective covers yet to be made.  I quite like to see the mechanicals in action, so I am intending to make the covers from clear polycarbonate.(Lexan) .

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The CNC lathe has 3 belts. There is a V belt from the 3 phase motor to the main lathe spindle.  Although I changed the motor and the pulleys, the old belt fitted, which was good.  No hassle. But the stepper motors driving the lead screw and cross slide screw, and their pulleys were all […]

CNC Lathe conversion – 9

The CNC lathe conversion has been happening, despite no posts on the blog.

I have mounted the electronics enclosure, and mounted the various components inside.  No wiring yet.

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This stainless steel tool box is the electronics enclosure.  It fits the space quite nicely, and is adequately big.  The back gear cover to the right will be retained, although the back gears have been discarded.  The main switch and emergency stop will be mounted somewhere on this cover.

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The Variable speed drive (VSD) sits on top.  That will control the spindle speed.  The transformers, stepper motor drives, and Breakout board (the heart of the system) are positioned inside.  Plus cooling fan and filters.  Ready for wiring.

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Drilling the apron to attach the cross slide ball screw bearing.  One chance only at this one, so the setting up took a couple of hours.  The apron is clamped to a large angle bracket on the milling table.   M6 threading followed.

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The end result.  The bearing as attached to the apron and the ball screw is in place.  I machined the end of this ball screw to fit the bearing, cut a thread (M10x1), and machined the end to accept the pulley.  All good.  There is 0.25mm adjustment available if required, but it all seems pretty correct.  The bearing sits on a carefully machined block which is 7.85mm thick.   Still waiting the lead screw machining.(!!)

NOT MUCH GOING ON TODAY

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This is my workbench after I had almost finished tidying it.  Really.  

 

Then I thought about machining the ends of the cross slide ball screw.

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So I mounted the collet chuck and checked the runout.   0 to o.01mm.  Then I did a test cut in the ball screw.   Hard hard hard.  But it did cut.  Then I chickened out and decided to finish it another day.

So, looking around the workshop for something else to do, I decided to pretty up the new CNC lathe apron.

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Before (milled surface).

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During

 

And I forgot to take a photo of the after, but it did look nice and smooth and shiny (look at the mirror finish behind the wheel).

Being retired is great!

CNC Lathe conversion-7

I am still waiting for the replacement ball nut for the lathe cross slide to arrive.

Meanwhile, I have been busy machining the supports for the lead screw.

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Drilling the holes for the support bolts for the lead screw nut

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And gradually drilling the hole to 49mm!

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That is a 49mm drill!  First time that I have used it!  Thank goodness for the  FS Wizard app, to give me some idea about feeds and speeds.  Following this I used a boring head to enlarge the hole to 55mm.

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Gradually enlarged the hole in 20mm steel to 55mm diameter.  and here is the lead ball screw, sitting roughly in its proper position.

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So this is where I am at.  The lead ball screw is sitting approximately in its correct position.  Considerable adjustment required.  And I am yet to turn the ball screw ends to their correct dimensions.

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